Proof Americans and Brits speak a different language

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  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    Gee D wrote: »
    And as for negotiations - pretty minimal. You turn top one of your neighbours and say that you've got the beef, would they like to swap their chicken. All very simple and it works.
    And if they say no? Now you're still stuck with a meal you don't want while you watch your neighbors on both sides eating the meal you would prefer, with a bit of resentment thrown in. Doesn't sound like a way to make new friends.

    Resentment? I give up.

  • ... Or alternately the ... density... of people who think that "throw a sweater on!" will solve the problem of hands too cold to type! (frozen nose, frozen toes, etc.)

    Funnily enough, "hands too cold to type" is a problem I only have in the summer, because of the aggressive air conditioning that is inflicted on us.

    Besides, density is definitely not my problem. I'm not dense at all. I have rather too much volume, and my density is rather less than it should be. These are not unconnected.
  • orfeoorfeo Shipmate
    Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    Gee D wrote: »
    And as for negotiations - pretty minimal. You turn top one of your neighbours and say that you've got the beef, would they like to swap their chicken. All very simple and it works.
    And if they say no?

    They won't.

    I'm quite interested in the idea that in these other, more formally polite cultures, they MIGHT.

  • Making a living in stone boxes with minimal heating for only part of the week I've become expert in layering clothes :grimace:

    It always amazes me that we get brides turning up in November in a strapless dress - gooseflesh is not a good look.
  • My comment about density referred to the mentally "dense" in offices worldwide, who turn the thermostat down to some ungodly number (usually in summer) and to all complaints, retort that the complainer "should just throw a sweater on!" The complainer is usually female, probably iron-deficient, often smaller than the (usually male) controller-of-the-thermostat, and most likely working on a keyboard which does not take kindly to gloves. A fucking sweater isn't going to cut it. Try a whole body snowsuit with gloves and a tongue controller for the computer.
  • AthrawesAthrawes Shipmate
    Maybe you *should* try that. It might get the message across! If nothing else, the resulting photo could be stuck under the air con remote, as a dire warning to others.

    I have long been of the opinion that males should never be allowed to set church air conditioning ( apologies to half the world’s population) because it looks stupid to be wearing half your wardrobe to church when it’s 40 + degrees outside.
  • .

    orfeo wrote: »
    Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    Gee D wrote: »
    And as for negotiations - pretty minimal. You turn top one of your neighbours and say that you've got the beef, would they like to swap their chicken. All very simple and it works.
    And if they say no?

    They won't.

    I'm quite interested in the idea that in these other, more formally polite cultures, they MIGHT.

    So you're forcing them to give up what they want to make you happy. And they won't resent that.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Athrawes wrote: »
    Maybe you *should* try that. It might get the message across! If nothing else, the resulting photo could be stuck under the air con remote, as a dire warning to others.

    I have long been of the opinion that males should never be allowed to set church air conditioning ( apologies to half the world’s population) because it looks stupid to be wearing half your wardrobe to church when it’s 40 + degrees outside.

    Although it might mean you putting up with us in sleeveless vests and shorts.

  • AthrawesAthrawes Shipmate
    That will not be a problem.
  • Nope. Go naked for all I care.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    I had a flatmate worked in a very big library. Some visiting high heid yin found the meeting room too hot and decreed a maximum temperature for the whole building - fine for south-facing rooms with windows, bloody Siberia in the stacks.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    I'm hoping things have moved on naturally, but this is just a gentle Hostly note that the discussion of swapping plates at Australian dinners has several times veered over the line from "Wow, aren't our different customs interesting!" to "People are idiots for liking/disliking my cultural thing." Please remember to keep things civil and Heavenly as we compare our different cultures, and also, let's stop talking about Australian dinner-swapping. That topic has officially run its course.

    Trudy, Heavenly Host
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Re Aircon - it's very odd really how some people (e.g. me) can be sweating in a shirt while other people are shivering in a fleece. I'm not sure how we can accommodate everyone.
  • KarlLB wrote: »
    Re Aircon - it's very odd really how some people (e.g. me) can be sweating in a shirt while other people are shivering in a fleece. I'm not sure how we can accommodate everyone.

    I think at a minimum, you can expect people who are hot to strip down to shirt sleeves, and people who are cold to wear an extra layer. That helps - it allows the cold people to tolerate a somewhat colder room, and the hot people to tolerate a hotter room. It can only work so far, though - if your hands are too cold to comfortably type, a sweater doesn't do much. In my experience, it's drafts that are more of a problem for hands than temperature per se - if you sit by the door, or in the airflow from an AC vent, you'll have cold hands. You can do better by paying attention to airflow (but nobody ever does), and you can sometimes mitigate things like AC vents by putting diverters on them to direct the flow away from your keyboard.


  • PriscillaPriscilla Shipmate
    with regard to cold hands, I find wrist warmers are really helpful. The company I had mine from - made from recycled cashmere jumpers! - reckons that if your wrists are warm, you feel a lot warmer generally.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Re Aircon - it's very odd really how some people (e.g. me) can be sweating in a shirt while other people are shivering in a fleece. I'm not sure how we can accommodate everyone.

    I think at a minimum, you can expect people who are hot to strip down to shirt sleeves, and people who are cold to wear an extra layer. That helps - it allows the cold people to tolerate a somewhat colder room, and the hot people to tolerate a hotter room. It can only work so far, though - if your hands are too cold to comfortably type, a sweater doesn't do much. In my experience, it's drafts that are more of a problem for hands than temperature per se - if you sit by the door, or in the airflow from an AC vent, you'll have cold hands. You can do better by paying attention to airflow (but nobody ever does), and you can sometimes mitigate things like AC vents by putting diverters on them to direct the flow away from your keyboard.


    I'm in shirt sleeves all year round. I would very seldom want to wear a jumper or jacket indoors.
  • It's probably much too invasive, but having a company-wide optional screening for iron deficiency would go a long way. And DON'T focus it only on the women.
  • My hands are always cold in the winter (I had every medical test known to man, and 94% known to woman; I just have cold hands). I found stretchy gloves for needleworkers really help. They're thin enough to allow full motion. They don't cover the fingers but having the back of the hands covered really helps.
  • CAPSICUM.

    In the US it means the pepper family in general, from the bland to the oh-my-god-make-it-stop. In other places I am given to understand that it means a certain kind of plant in the pepper family, and its pod (what we call "bell peppers"). Seeking enlightenment from English-speakers of other regions of the world.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited January 10
    mousethief wrote: »
    CAPSICUM.

    In the US it means the pepper family in general, from the bland to the oh-my-god-make-it-stop. In other places I am given to understand that it means a certain kind of plant in the pepper family, and its pod (what we call "bell peppers"). Seeking enlightenment from English-speakers of other regions of the world.

    In my neck of the woods we don't use the word, although if pressed we'd define it as what you call a bell pepper.

    Bell peppers we just call peppers.

    The hot ones we call chillis.

    They are thought of as rather different things; the bland ones are vegetables (I did some with onions and mushrooms in the griddle pan with the toad in the hole tonight) whereas the hot ones are more a cooking ingredient for spicy dishes, usually curry or chilli. To confuse things we call the beef and kidney bean spicy thing chilli as well. Chilli con carne is the Sunday Best name but I'm told the name is nearly as inauthentic as the recipes we use for it.

    But I digress.
  • Down here, it's "capsicum" for bell peppers and "chilli peppers" or just "chillis" for the other sort. Usage much as KarlLB suggests.

    As an aside, Australians seem to struggle with the pronunciation of Spanish words in the context of food - so you hear "chilly con carn" and "halapeeno", in an odd sort of halfway house.
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    My wife works at the Washington State University Library. Turns out the lights in the building generate so much heat they have the air conditioning system on year around. Her desk is right under the air duct. Consequently, she has to wear a sweater year-round.

  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Time they switched to LEDs. Save on energy cost of lighting, save on air conditioning.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Kittyville wrote: »
    Down here, it's "capsicum" for bell peppers and "chilli peppers" or just "chillis" for the other sort. Usage much as KarlLB suggests.

    As an aside, Australians seem to struggle with the pronunciation of Spanish words in the context of food - so you hear "chilly con carn" and "halapeeno", in an odd sort of halfway house.

    Add "Choritso" to that. We quite often hear an English J on Jalapeño. English speakers seem to find the idea that diacritics aren't purely ornamental quite difficult. Another halfway house popular in the UK is getting the "z" right in Ibiza but pronouncing the initial vowel like English "eye".
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Us ones have had the Spanish holiday say 'coreetho' and 'yallapaino'.
  • Priscilla wrote: »
    with regard to cold hands, I find wrist warmers are really helpful. The company I had mine from - made from recycled cashmere jumpers! - reckons that if your wrists are warm, you feel a lot warmer generally.
    I have a pair of silk fingerless gloves by my computer as my home office can get cold.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    I agree with @KarlLB. Word 'capsicum' is not used here.

    'Red' or 'Green Peppers' = the vegetable.
    'Pepper' = the powder one sprinkles on food and adds to a lot of dishes, preferably little black corns that one grinds in a mill at the table but also available as a powder.
    'Chilli' usually though plural = the little hot fiery red berries, usually sold dried which are also the main ingredient of a lot of hot sauces.

    Chilli con carne is pronounced as @Kittyville classes as the Australian pronunciation, "chilly con carn". I'm not sure how else one might say it. Pronouncing the 'carn' as two syllables, which is the only other option I can think of, would sound as affected as Paree or Madreeth.

    The usual Brenglish pronunciation of Ibiza is Eye-beetha. I think it's fair to say that any other way of pronouncing it proclaims either ignorance or affectation. Likewise Majorca is Mǝ-yorka. Pronouncing the 'j' as a 'j' proclaims one's ignorance. Pronouncing it as a throttled guttural sound proclaims affectation.


    Where a place name differs between two languages or has a different pronunciation in one language from the other, one should take its form or pronunciation from the language one is speaking at the time. So, in an English sentence, Swansea. In a Welsh one Abertawe (four syllables). Antwerp is Antwerp in English, pronounced as spelt, irrespective of whatever it is in the various languages spoken in the area. There are some oddities and irregularities about this. Bratislava hasn't really got a specifically English name. It's usually Bratislava, but I think if you were actually speaking German at the time, it would be Pressburg.

    Seville, where the barber and the oranges come from, is Sǝvill with the stress on the second syllable. It is not Seveeyǝ. However, I think the oranges themselves are suppose to be pronounced Sevǝl with the stress on the first syllable.
  • Surprised to hear you think car-ney would sound affected. I've never heard it pronounced any other way since I was first introduced to the dish in the late 70s.
  • I agree, RA - perhaps it’s a regional difference - it was certainly car-ney in London when I became aware of it in the 80s.
  • I quite like the way that IKEA (eye-Kee-ah to most Brits) has been calling itself ee-Kay-ah in the more recent adverts, teaching us all how to pronounce it properly.
  • Here (Southern US), “chili” means the dish served in a bowl. It might have meat, might have beans or any number of other things. Opinions can run strong over what should be in it. (Mine has beer and chocolate in it, along with steak and beans.) I rarely if ever hear the dish called “chili con carne.”

    If the pepper is meant, then it’s “chili pepper,” though use of a more specific name—bell, jalapeño, cayenne, habanero, etc.—is much more common.

    “Pepper” alone usually means black pepper, though it can also mean white, green or another variety.

  • Beer and chocolate? I need that!
  • I used to cook a dark chocolate risotto, and people swooned over it, not from food poisoning. Oops, going o/t.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    This comment about dark chocolate risotto needs to go straight to the recipe thread, @quetzalcoatl !!
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Wet Kipper wrote: »
    I quite like the way that IKEA (eye-Kee-ah to most Brits) has been calling itself ee-Kay-ah in the more recent adverts, teaching us all how to pronounce it properly.

    Or more accurately, trying to teach us that that is how they pronounce it.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Hell Host, 8th Day Host
    It's "chili con carne:" CHEE-lay cone CAR-nay. It's Spanish. It's pretty basic.
  • chee-lay? not if it's chili. That would be CHEE-lee. You're thinking perhaps of the country Chile.
  • @Priscilla above: with regard to cold hands, I find wrist warmers are really helpful. The company I had mine from - made from recycled cashmere jumpers!

    Yes! On cold New England nights I am cold in the house even though others are comfy. I've found that cutting off the uppr part of socks just above the heel makes a pair of nifty wrist warmers and does wonders for making me warm
  • Surprised to hear you think car-ney would sound affected. I've never heard it pronounced any other way since I was first introduced to the dish in the late 70s.
    Yes, I’ve only ever heard ‘car-ney’. ( could be regional, I suppose, I’m SE/London/East Anglia)
  • Rossweisse wrote: »
    It's "chili con carne:" CHEE-lay cone CAR-nay. It's Spanish. It's pretty basic.

    Over hear I've never heard cone, only ever con. I live and learn.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    I recognise that it’s Spanish, but the universal pronunciation I have encountered in Britain is chilly con carny.
  • RossweisseRossweisse Hell Host, 8th Day Host
    Yes, it's "chilly." I got that one wrong. But it's also "car-nay." I got that one right.
  • In the end it probably depends on where you're from. People here say "AY-thens" and "MAD-rid" as well as "BALL-iv-er" (for Athens, Madrid and Bolivar) and that's just the way it is. I got pegged as an outsider the moment I opened my Southern California mouth.
  • Rossweisse wrote: »
    Yes, it's "chilly." I got that one wrong. But it's also "car-nay." I got that one right.

    But I've never heard "cone."
  • The things I hear are accents on different syllables. Some of it is quite subtle. Chil-LAY versus CHIL-lay. Also the length of time of the vowels and if the tone is inflected down or up.

    With the name of the Canadian prime minister Trudeau it's quite noticeable. Though it can depend if you're in French or English mode.

  • mousethief wrote: »
    Rossweisse wrote: »
    Yes, it's "chilly." I got that one wrong. But it's also "car-nay." I got that one right.

    But I've never heard "cone."

    "Con" is pronounced "cone" according to the Spanish speakers who taught me in So. Cal. It may very well be different (either the Spanish OR English pronunciations) elsewhere.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    Rossweisse wrote: »
    Yes, it's "chilly." I got that one wrong. But it's also "car-nay." I got that one right.

    But I've never heard "cone."

    "Con" is pronounced "cone" according to the Spanish speakers who taught me in So. Cal. It may very well be different (either the Spanish OR English pronunciations) elsewhere.

    Of course it is. But when people in these parts say "chili con carne" they're not trying to speak Spanish, just name a food.
  • Sure. But when the people I grew up with in Southern California ordered chili con carne, that's the way they said it: "Chillay cone carnay." I expect it comes of being closer to the border, but nobody ever said con in a way that made it rhyme with John or Don. It was "cone", or people would figure you were from out of state.
  • Cone said by one accent is different than another. Dialects and accents be interesting.
  • I've actually decided that it's interesting that we're generically comparing Brits and Americans here. There are plenty of both countries that I simply cannot understand, but both have core areas of dialects that are quite clear. I defy you to compare the incomprehensibility of a Cumbrian accent with one from Georgia, a Yorkshire one versus Alabama. And up here there's Newfoundland, where the dialect also gets a bit hard to understand. The "English" language is very diverse.
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