Rossweisse
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Sunday Next Before Advent

My deacon and I were discussing the Calendar and he observed that before Anglicans adapted Christ the King Sunday, the Last Sunday of the Church Year was not a big deal in the Anglican tradition. We said that according to the Prayerbook, the Church year ended not with a bang but with a whimper.

Was that the case in other denominations such as the RC church before Vatican II? I take it, that before the Vatican II, no one thought of Advent Sunday as the "Christian New Year?

Comments

  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    I was around before Vat 2, and the first Sunday in Advent was indeed the start of the new liturgical year and seen as such.
    Christ the King was instituted in 1925 - I certainly wasn't around then!
  • I have the feeling that the OPer was really referring to the Sunday before Advent and the end of the liturgical year,rather than the beginning. Liturgically the First Sunday of Advent has been seen for centuries as the beginning of the Christian yearly cycle.
    1st November was the beginning of the Celtic New Year and taken over by the Western Christians as All Saints Day and All Souls Day - a day of ending and beginning.
    When Pius XI instituted the Feast of Christ the King,he placed it on the Sunday before All Saints Day,keeping in mind this idea of end and beginning.
    After Vatican 2 the Church placed it on the last Sunday of the Christian Year.

    Before that the RC church(and I think the Anglican Church commemorated the 'Last Things' (death and judgement) on the final sun days of the ecclesiastical year.

    I don't know about Lutherans in America but German Lutherans have on the last Sunday before Advent Totensonntag or Ewigkeitssonntag - (Sunday of the dead Sunday of eternity ), a Lutheran celebration of All Souls but also of the Eternity which awaits faithful Christians.
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    The readings in the RC lectionary on the last couple of Sundays before Xt King are about the Second Coming. Don't remember if that was the case before Vat2.
  • Before Vatican2 the Gospel Reading on the 'Last Sunday after Pentecost' was taken from Matthew 24,15-35 and was about the 'End times'
    At that time there was a bit of a problem due to the movable Feast of Easter. If Easter was very earlier then there were more Sundays after Pentecost (for Anglicans and Lutherans 'after Trinity') than there was a liturgy for. After the 23rd Sunday after Pentecost earlier Sundays after Epiphany which had been miss out came in at that time until the final Last Sunday after Pentecost.
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    Ooh that was fiddly. No wonder it was cleaned up.
  • Forthview wrote: »
    Liturgically the First Sunday of Advent has been seen for centuries as the beginning of the Christian yearly cycle.
    In the Western Church. In Orthodoxy, as I understand it, the liturgical year begins on September 1.

  • Thanks,Nick T., I should have said for the Western Church.
  • My deacon and I were discussing the Calendar and he observed that before Anglicans adapted Christ the King Sunday, the Last Sunday of the Church Year was not a big deal in the Anglican tradition. We said that according to the Prayerbook, the Church year ended not with a bang but with a whimper.

    I'd question that. I think it depended on the importance attached to it by the parish priest. Don't forget, the BCP has one of the most inspiring Collects for the Sunday before Advent "STIR up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people; that they, plenteously bringing forth the fruit of good works, may of thee be plenteously rewarded ....

    And of course the Sunday had added significance as "Stir up Sunday" because of the old tradition of it being the deadline for the making of Christmas pudding.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited October 22
    The *Stir-Up* collect is prescribed in Common Worship (in its contemporary form, but not so very different from the original) as the post-Communion prayer on Christ the King Sunday.

    An inspiring, and indeed encouraging, prayer for the end of the Eucharist.

    A note adds that it may be used as the regular Collect at the offices during the following week, after which, of course, the Advent provision is used.
  • CyprianCyprian Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Forthview wrote: »
    Liturgically the First Sunday of Advent has been seen for centuries as the beginning of the Christian yearly cycle.
    In the Western Church. In Orthodoxy, as I understand it, the liturgical year begins on September 1.

    When a church celebrates the beginning of the liturgical year is a matter of liturgical rite rather than ecclesial affiliation.

    The marking of the new year with the Induction on the 1st of September is characteristic of the Byzantine Rite, so isn't limited to Orthodoxy or universal within Orthodoxy.

    For instance, Byzantine Rite Catholics also keep the 1st of September as the church new year, while many Orthodox do not.
  • Thanks @Cyprian. I did know that, and I should been more precise.

  • CyprianCyprian Shipmate
    Forthview wrote: »
    Before Vatican2 the Gospel Reading on the 'Last Sunday after Pentecost' was taken from Matthew 24,15-35 and was about the 'End times'

    That's still very much the case in the Western Orthodox churches. There is no significant feast; it's just the final Sunday after Pentecost, entitled "The Consummation of the Age".
    At that time there was a bit of a problem due to the movable Feast of Easter. If Easter was very earlier then there were more Sundays after Pentecost (for Anglicans and Lutherans 'after Trinity') than there was a liturgy for. After the 23rd Sunday after Pentecost earlier Sundays after Epiphany which had been miss out came in at that time until the final Last Sunday after Pentecost.

    I don't think we encounter this particular problem as we have an Advent of six Sundays, beginning on the day after the feast of St Martin.
  • I am not surprised that the Western Orthodox Church has not introduced into its calendar
    the Feast of Christ the King, neither on its earlier date just before All Saints' Day nor on its later placing at the culmination of the liturgical year,
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    For a while in our diocese Christ the King was also Yoof Sunday when the young people took over the planning of the main Sunday liturgy.
    The results were as dire as expected.
  • @Alan29 - was there a particular reason for choosing Christ the King Sunday for that nefarious porpoise?
    :open_mouth:
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    edited November 27
    @Alan29 - was there a particular reason for choosing Christ the King Sunday for that nefarious porpoise?
    :open_mouth:

    No idea. It has now lapsed. I would have to check the diocesan ordo to see if it mentioned. But the church is locked and I dont have a copy.
    EDIT it is apparently a national thing
    https://www.cbcew.org.uk/home/events/previous-events/national-youth-sunday-2020/
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