Rossweisse
RIP Rossweisse, HellHost and long-time Shipmate.
Please see the thread in All Saints remembering her.

Spring Forward, Fall Back.

If we are not going anywhere much, and don't have to do anything at a specific time any more, will the clocks actually change? (Cue timber falling in the forest.)
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Comments

  • cgichardcgichard Shipmate
    There was talk here in Victoria (Antipodes) of omitting "daylight saving" this year, for exactly the reasons you mention. I somehow took hold of the idea that had been agreed upon, so was taken completely by surprise on the Sunday when the clocks did spring forward two weeks ago.
  • The clocks are due to *go back* (O if only! To about 2010, please...) on Sunday 25th October...in England, that is.

    Given the strange days we're living in, I wouldn't be surprised to learn that NI, Wales, and Scotland, were doing something different...
  • I don't think Wales is doing anything different, but will it matter anyway? We'll be on total lockdown and nothing will be open - does it really matter what time of day it is? Or even which day it is?! Being an orderly person, I'll probably turn my clocks back, but it shouldn't make a lot of difference.
  • Well, yes - there's nowhere much to go to, and nothing much to do when you get there, but I do still attend church on Sunday (if we in England are still open), and would prefer not to be an hour early...
    :wink:
  • I'm in a jurisdiction without daylight savings / summer time. I wonder how many around the world are unchanging.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    The car and cooker clocks will be right again - hurrah!

    I like the light in the morning these days as I’m an early riser. But it takes a while for my body clock to adjust.

  • I haven't had to deal with Daylight "Savings" Time in forty years -- since I moved to Arizona.
    :smile:
  • OhherOhher Shipmate
    The never-ending battle by individual US states over clock-changing in must drive transport-schedulers bananas. But would it be any easier if we abandoned DST?
  • Chorister wrote: »
    I don't think Wales is doing anything different, but will it matter anyway? We'll be on total lockdown and nothing will be open - does it really matter what time of day it is? Or even which day it is?! Being an orderly person, I'll probably turn my clocks back, but it shouldn't make a lot of difference.

    With the lockdown beginning in Wales on Friday night, nothing can cross the border except for essential business. I think we can all agree that there's nothing essential about moving into winter, so no need to change the clocks in Wales until we come out of lockdown - by which time England may have closed its borders...
  • NenyaNenya Shipmate
    Someone posted on Twitter they wouldn't be changing their clocks as they didn't want an extra hour added to 2020.
  • Nenya wrote: »
    Someone posted on Twitter they wouldn't be changing their clocks as they didn't want an extra hour added to 2020.

    However, one was already taken away in March just after Lockdown I started, so they are just balancing the year out!
  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    I haven't had to deal with Daylight "Savings" Time in forty years -- since I moved to Arizona.
    :smile:

    ...and don't hang out on the Navajo res. :wink:
  • Nenya wrote: »
    Someone posted on Twitter they wouldn't be changing their clocks as they didn't want an extra hour added to 2020.

    Wasn't that the same reason why the calendar was devised with fewer days in February?
  • So far: Arizona and Saskatchewan have checked in re not changing clocks ever.
  • All I know is every spring and fall time change confuses the dog for about 2 weeks.
  • Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    I haven't had to deal with Daylight "Savings" Time in forty years -- since I moved to Arizona.
    :smile:

    ;) Show-off! ;)
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I confess that as an Orcadian, I've always appreciated clock-changing: it makes all the difference to the dark winter days. Now that I'm back in God's Own Country™, even at the southern end of it, I'll be perfectly happy to put my clocks back.

    I often find (and even in the peculiar present circumstances) that I look forward to the clocks changing (especially when they go back); I find myself feeling tired and just needing that extra hour! To an extent, it even applies in spring, even though I'm losing an hour - I'm just ready for it, and would miss it if it didn't happen.
  • HelixHelix Shipmate
    I love it! It's part of the rhythm of the season, which includes conversations such as "the nights are drawing in ..."

    And I do love the lighter mornings but not so the dark evenings. If only we could change the clock throughout the day - so 8am became the new 6am and 4pm became the new 10pm. That would truly wreak havoc on our bodies but it would mean no dark afternoons.
  • Actually not too sure it would wreak havoc on our bodies, it is sort of what people must have done before mechanical clocks came about.
  • O that extra hour in bed this Sunday! Bliss!

    Especially as I've GOT to get up and go to church (my turn to preach Ye Sermon).
  • TelfordTelford Shipmate
    I would keep BST. If this means that some kids would have to go to school in the dark for a few weeks, change the school hours.
  • Yes, but that could be awkward for working parents, who may not necessarily be able to alter their hours for those few weeks.

    Mind you, with everything in such a muddle at the moment, perhaps keeping BST wouldn't matter!
  • HedgehogHedgehog Shipmate
    I have eleven mechanical clocks in the house. Moving them an hour ahead is relatively easy, but the only safe way to "turn" them back an hour is to stop them all, and then try to remember to re-start them in about an hour.
  • Hedgehog wrote: »
    I have eleven mechanical clocks in the house. Moving them an hour ahead is relatively easy, but the only safe way to "turn" them back an hour is to stop them all, and then try to remember to re-start them in about an hour.
    You can’t move them forward 11 hours?

  • TelfordTelford Shipmate
    Yes, but that could be awkward for working parents, who may not necessarily be able to alter their hours for those few weeks.

    Mind you, with everything in such a muddle at the moment, perhaps keeping BST wouldn't matter!

    My mom took me to school on my 5th birthday. After that I made my own way.
  • Bishops FingerBishops Finger Shipmate
    edited October 21
    I wasn't thinking so much of children walking to school, as possibly being left alone in the house until school time (Mum and/or Dad having had to go earlier).

    Walking - and that's no fun in the traffic of English towns! - may not be an option, if the school is a long way away.
  • How be dispense with timezones entirely. One time zone to rule them all! unchanging time. If you're in my part of the world, lunch time is at 1800, or 6pm.
  • ...and in the Dark to bind them!
    :scream:
  • Ethne AlbaEthne Alba Shipmate
    edited October 21
    We have No working official clocks in our house and both the watches are on shelving somewhere. And that was a quite deliberate decision once retirement hit.
    But digital clocks are on smart phones , boiler, radio and the various computer-things.

    I do know (very!) roughly what time of the day it is...... but the Day Itself? No chance now.

    Already this week I’ve got Saturday and Sunday mixed up whilst today everything was ready and prepared for a loss adjuster.....

    Who is actually arriving tomorrow



    The concept of time was always quite important to me. Last two years? Far less so. It will be interesting to see if the falling back makes any noticeable difference!
  • I haven't worn a watch since I retired from work in 2014, but I have a couple of clocks (including an alarm clock) as there are days when there is something in particular to get out of bed for!

    My laptop clock adjusts itself, of course, though the dashboard clock in the car doesn't - but it's only a Ford Fiesta, so one can't expect too much...
  • This will be the first time I don't have to physically adjust my phone as I now have a smartphone. The cooker will get done on Monday unless we get back from church reasonably close to midday, as the only way to change it is to turn it off at the wall and back on again (and it needs to be correct if I want to use the delayed start function.)

    Tbh, apart from appointments, Dragonlet 3 requires measuring time in days and weeks for when various health checks are due.
  • HedgehogHedgehog Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Hedgehog wrote: »
    I have eleven mechanical clocks in the house. Moving them an hour ahead is relatively easy, but the only safe way to "turn" them back an hour is to stop them all, and then try to remember to re-start them in about an hour.
    You can’t move them forward 11 hours?
    These are all chiming clocks, so you would have to stop on every hour (and half hour) to let them run through their chimes. Otherwise, you screw up the chime train. As annoying as it is, letting them stop for an hour is way easier.

  • TelfordTelford Shipmate
    I wasn't thinking so much of children walking to school, as possibly being left alone in the house until school time (Mum and/or Dad having had to go earlier).

    Walking - and that's no fun in the traffic of English towns! - may not be an option, if the school is a long way away.
    I agree. That's why I haed to go on the bus when I changed schools when I was nearly 7

  • TelfordTelford Shipmate
    Hedgehog wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Hedgehog wrote: »
    I have eleven mechanical clocks in the house. Moving them an hour ahead is relatively easy, but the only safe way to "turn" them back an hour is to stop them all, and then try to remember to re-start them in about an hour.
    You can’t move them forward 11 hours?
    These are all chiming clocks, so you would have to stop on every hour (and half hour) to let them run through their chimes. Otherwise, you screw up the chime train. As annoying as it is, letting them stop for an hour is way easier.

    We had a large non chiming clock high up on the wall where I worked. The rear was accessed in the attic space. There were two buttons on the inside. Button 1 would stop the clock for one hour in the Autumn. Button 2 would stop the clock for 11 hours in the Spring

    Or was it the other way round ?

  • :lol:

    Now I'm confused - but the Buttons were a Good Idea...
  • Hedgehog wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Hedgehog wrote: »
    I have eleven mechanical clocks in the house. Moving them an hour ahead is relatively easy, but the only safe way to "turn" them back an hour is to stop them all, and then try to remember to re-start them in about an hour.
    You can’t move them forward 11 hours?
    These are all chiming clocks, so you would have to stop on every hour (and half hour) to let them run through their chimes. Otherwise, you screw up the chime train. As annoying as it is, letting them stop for an hour is way easier.
    Ah! Yes, I see how it would be easier.

  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    I'm happy to find a few other people who actually like the twice-yearly clock-changing ritual. I know so many people hate it and find it difficult, and I am sorry for them and understand why some places are looking at stopping it, but I personally do really like it and, as someone else said above, for me it's part of marking the rhythm of the seasons. Of course it will get darker earlier and earlier as winter comes anyway, but that sudden jolt of having it happen an hour sooner as November starts really warns me that winter is coming -- and then the lovely joy of the extra hour of evening light in March! It may be unfashionable to admit it but I do enjoy the seasonal changes.
  • We alter our clocks and watches before we go to bed. It seems strange going to bed at either “9” or “11”, but it’s less potch* in the morning, and we’re less likely to be at church at the wrong time.
    * potch - dialect for mix up, hassle
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Priscilla wrote: »
    We alter our clocks and watches before we go to bed. It seems strange going to bed at either “9” or “11”, but it’s less potch* in the morning, and we’re less likely to be at church at the wrong time.
    * potch - dialect for mix up, hassle

    Yes, we do the same. Two of ours do themselves by radio signal.

    I still google ‘what time is it?’ in the morning ‘tho, I don’t trust them or my phone to do it every time!

  • HollyHolly Shipmate Posts: 24
    Trudy wrote: »
    I'm happy to find a few other people who actually like the twice-yearly clock-changing ritual. I know so many people hate it and find it difficult, and I am sorry for them and understand why some places are looking at stopping it, but I personally do really like it and, as someone else said above, for me it's part of marking the rhythm of the seasons. Of course it will get darker earlier and earlier as winter comes anyway, but that sudden jolt of having it happen an hour sooner as November starts really warns me that winter is coming -- and then the lovely joy of the extra hour of evening light in March! It may be unfashionable to admit it but I do enjoy the seasonal changes.

    I think i'm also one of the few who enjoy this. For the same reasons as above i love the move into each season and enjoy what each one brings.
  • It's certainly very helpful to be woken up by Radio 3 news, saying what time it is. Just in case I've forgotten, and just in case it really matters (not this year, of course).

  • TelfordTelford Shipmate
    edited October 25
    I recall a time when I worked a 3 shift system. The pay was the same whether you worked 9 hours or 7 hours. I always seemed to work the 9 hours
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    I wish there was some way to reset my body clock - 'It's 6.30!' 'No it isn't. Go back to sleep.' 'Can't. Need bathroom'. 'Alright. Now will you go back to sleep?' ' Naw. Awake now. Besides it's 6.40.' 'No it isn't!'
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    I’m with you there!
  • HelixHelix Shipmate
    Yes me too! I think instead of an extra hour in bed, it will be an extra hour in the day! Perhaps I will sneak in an afternoon nap ... :smiley:
  • How be dispense with timezones entirely. One time zone to rule them all! unchanging time. If you're in my part of the world, lunch time is at 1800, or 6pm.
    That used to happen on the Trans-Siberian Railway until fairly recently: it all ran in Moscow time. So the timings were bizarre by the time the train reached Vladivostock!

  • Boogie wrote: »
    I’m with you there!

    Likewise. Woke up at 5.50 and managed to lie in bed, bored, till 7am!
  • Suffolk RobSuffolk Rob Shipmate Posts: 38
    Telford wrote: »
    I recall a time when I worked a 3 shift system. The pay was the same whether you worked 9 hours or 7 hours. I always seemed to work the 9 hours

    Not that you’re bitter😊
  • So glad I had the company of Firenze, Boogie, Helix and BT this (early) morning.
  • Telford wrote: »
    I recall a time when I worked a 3 shift system. The pay was the same whether you worked 9 hours or 7 hours. I always seemed to work the 9 hours

    Not that you’re bitter😊

    Seem to remember there's a parable somewhere about this....
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