Proof Americans and Brits speak a different language

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  • Enoch wrote: »
    It's not. Compensation refers to the whole package - not just salary, but benefits as well. In the US, where medical and dental insurance are often provided by your employer, and are very variable, a different benefit package can make a big difference to someone's total compensation.
    Ah. Those are 'benefits' here. They're classed as wages/salary and are subject to income tax. They don't fit within what 'compensation' means here.

    The HR term for salary + benefits + any other gains from or as a result of your employment is the 'Total Reward Package'. You may or may not feel that this is better than the term 'compensation '.
  • CaissaCaissa Shipmate
    In my place of employ it is the "total compensation package:.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    The HR term for salary + benefits + any other gains from or as a result of your employment is the 'Total Reward Package'. You may or may not feel that this is better than the term 'compensation '.
    I agree that's not that much better, but it isn't quite so dramatically stealing the meaning of a word that (to me and I suspect most other people who speak the same dialect as I do) has a different semantic envelope in the way that 'compensation' does.

  • I'd call that a remuneration package or the total remuneration, because that's what I've seen most in that situation.
  • mousethiefmousethief Shipmate
    edited September 29
    "Reward" seems like an odd word to use for something you earn by the sweat of your brow, and are by any means entitled to. "Reward" sounds like something you get for finding someone's dog. It's a nice bonus, but you should return the dog anyway if you're a decent human being. I am not required to work at my job by dint of being a decent human being.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    @mousethief I agree with you. That's why using 'compensation' this way sounds very weird and a significant misnomer unless you're used to hearing it.

  • I've always known it as the salary package.
  • Salary package is in fairly common use in Australia.
  • If your package gets a salary, you're a gigolo.

    I'll get my coat.
  • DoublethinkDoublethink Admin, Purgatory Host
    I thought this might amuse folk: https://youtu.be/AZs6LbPJUpY
  • I thought this might amuse folk: https://youtu.be/AZs6LbPJUpY

    That is delightful. She's very good. It's interesting how she stands stock still, while most comedians rock on their heels, or walk about, or fiddle with the microphone.

    What's her accent?
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    South Shields. North east of England, not far from Newcastle.
  • mousethief wrote: »

    That is delightful. She's very good. It's interesting how she stands stock still, while most comedians rock on their heels, or walk about, or fiddle with the microphone.

    It's from a TV program where she was the host, rather than a recording of a stand up routine.

    That being said, she doesn't move around a lot during stand up either.
  • DoublethinkDoublethink Admin, Purgatory Host
    edited November 22
    There’s loads of her content on YouTube, though I should warn you she talks a lot about female sexuality in a way that would not be considered worksafe, and she occasionally uses the c word in the course of her routines.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    edited November 27
    I'm not sure whether this is a Pond difference or a chronological one. The latest variant discovered in South Africa is the omicron one. That means there have been ten since the current delta one that haven't made the headlines. That isn't, though, what I'm asking about. It's how it's pronounced.

    The news reader yesterday evening (British but may not have heard the word before) called it the ommicron one with the emphasis on the first syllable, a subsidiary emphasis on the last, two short 'o's as in 'pom' and a short 'i' as in 'pit'. When I was taught the Greek alphabet many years ago, it was o-my-cron, with the first 'o' not much more than a 'ǝ', the emphasis on the middle syllable, pronounced 'my' as in the first person singular possessive and the last syllable a short 'i' as in 'pit'. I'm not sure I've heard the word used by anyone for decades.

    Checking the Pocket Oxford Dictionary I was given for Christmas in 1955, that gives the pronunciation I was taught and no other. The same seems to be the case in another dictionary from the 1970s.

    This seems to suggest there is a Pond difference. Which is it to you?

    Whichever is right in your dialect of English, I'm fairly certain neither bear much resemblance to how it would be in any version of Greek spoken now or at any time in the past!

  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Glad the Theta one didn't really get going... But yes, we seem to be roaring through the alphabet at speed - what happens when we get to omega and it's still mutating? Move on to Runic?

    Anyway, when I did ancient Greek (not that long after the original speakers) it was oh-MIC-ron.
  • Gill HGill H Shipmate
    They could copy ‘Only Connect’ and use Egyptian hieroglyphs?

    “I’ve got the Eye of Horus variant.”

    I do remember reading about the Lambda variant, if only because so many people mistook it for ‘Lambada’ and thought it was a joke!
  • When I learned Greek, in Scotland, it was O-mi-cron.
  • This American (who never studied Greek and who learned the Greek alphabet as a fraternity pledge) has never heard o-MY-cron or o-MIC-ron, though in light of the etymology it would make sense, and would parallel o-MEH-ga. But I’ve always heard OM-i-cron; that’s the standard American pronunciation.

  • My greek alphabet all comes from math. I had one lecturer who insisted on pronouncing the ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle as "pee", which might well be a more correct Greek pronunciation, but would be a complete disaster in a room full of 9-year-old boys.
  • Alan29Alan29 Shipmate
    I'm left wondering which dialect of English has 'homour' rather than 'humour' or 'humor'.

    Tartare sauce is for use with fish. It may go with other things but it makes the Baby Jesus cry.
    :naughty: Tangent:
    What is wrong with making Baby Jesus cry? I don't recall anything about Jesus crying ever.
    /Tangent

    Lazarus.
  • "oh-mih-cron" (learnt at college in California)
  • Alan29 wrote: »
    I'm left wondering which dialect of English has 'homour' rather than 'humour' or 'humor'.

    Tartare sauce is for use with fish. It may go with other things but it makes the Baby Jesus cry.
    :naughty: Tangent:
    What is wrong with making Baby Jesus cry? I don't recall anything about Jesus crying ever.
    /Tangent

    Lazarus.

    I think this ended up on the wrong thread.
  • Leorning CnihtLeorning Cniht Shipmate
    edited November 27
    Gramps49 wrote: »
    Alan29 wrote: »
    I'm left wondering which dialect of English has 'homour' rather than 'humour' or 'humor'.

    Tartare sauce is for use with fish. It may go with other things but it makes the Baby Jesus cry.
    :naughty: Tangent:
    What is wrong with making Baby Jesus cry? I don't recall anything about Jesus crying ever.
    /Tangent

    Lazarus.

    I think this ended up on the wrong thread.

    It was a perfectly apposite response to "I don't recall anything about Jesus crying".

    "Jesus wept" is well known to be the shortest verse in the (English) Bible.

    Jesus is weeping in response to the death of Lazarus.

    (But of course, you know that, and were making a comment about the Baby Jesus thread, and I'm being dense this morning.)
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