Proof Americans and Brits speak a different language

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  • 'Sneaked' or 'snuck'? I was brought up on the former, but the latter seems for have managed to sneak in fairly recently.
  • I sometimes think I’m the only American lawyer who says “pled” instead of “pleaded.”
  • I don't see where you get "pled" from.

    Bread = breaded. Knead = kneaded. Or do you think it should be Bread = bred, knead = kned?

    Only people from the western side of the pond use "dove" to describe a past action of entering a body of water. Here the word "dove" is a pigeon-like bird.
  • I don't see where you get "pled" from.
    Don’t know either, but it’s in the dictionary as an alternative to “pleaded.” Perhaps another example of an older form holding in longer in the States than in Britain?
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    And why is Welsh the language of Heaven? Because it takes all eternity to learn it.
  • Robert ArminRobert Armin Shipmate, Glory
    But it's worth it! (Or so I'm assured.)
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    edited September 2019
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Whereas here, where we invented the games in question, no-one refers to "soccer".

    From Wikipedia
    The rules of association football were codified in England by the Football Association in 1863 and the name association football was coined to distinguish the game from the other forms of football played at the time, specifically rugby football. The first written "reference to the inflated ball used in the game" was in the mid-14th century: "Þe heued fro þe body went, Als it were a foteballe". The Online Etymology Dictionary states that the "rules of the game" were made in 1848, before the "split off in 1863". The term soccer comes from a slang or jocular abbreviation of the word "association", with the suffix "-er" appended to it.[ The word soccer (which arrived at its final form in 1895) was first recorded in 1889 in the earlier form of socca.
    (Footnotes removed)

    One of the beauties of the English language is it is constantly changing. developing new words and new expressions.
  • there are two main forms of verbs in English
    strong such as I sing,I sang,I have sung (earlier sungen)
    weak such as I work,I worked,I have worked

    plus mixed such as I bring,I brought,I have brought

    strong verbs are constantly but slowly changing into weak verbs

    such as I help, I halp, I have holpen has changed into I help, I helped, I have helped
    and I work,I wrought,I have wrought into the weak form above

    plead, pled, pled becoming plead, pleaded, pleaded is a common enough change. These changes do not always occur at the same time in different parts of the English speaking world. What intrigues me at the moment is
    sing,sang,sung (based on singen,sang,gesungen in German)
    Many people now make the one word past tense to be 'sung' as in' he sung a song'
    To me that sounds wrong but I read and hear it a lot.
  • Why is rugby played in Heaven? Because everyone is speaking Welsh up there. Simple.

    Nag ydyn (no). Everyone in heaven speaks Hebrew. It's God who speaks Welsh.
  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    I sometimes think I’m the only American lawyer who says “pled” instead of “pleaded.”

    We have "pled" all the time in the phrase "He pled the Fifth [Amendment]."

    Other than that, I can see the problem.
  • Lamb ChoppedLamb Chopped Shipmate
    edited September 2019
    My husband assures me regularly that everyone in heaven speaks Vietnamese.

    I understand that English is the language of Hell. Or so he says...
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    edited September 2019
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    I sometimes think I’m the only American lawyer who says “pled” instead of “pleaded.”

    Are you the only one? The impression I had was that it was common pronunciation but still written "plead".

    Gramps, Thanks for doing the legwork. I'd always understood that to be the derivation of "soccer".
  • Head over heels.

    Ass over tea kettle.
  • Ohher wrote: »
    Head over heels.

    Ass over tea kettle.

    Whoops -- wrong spot. However, here in New England, "pled" is common. There's another term getting replaced with some neologism, but I can't quite recall it at the mo.
  • Golden KeyGolden Key Shipmate, Glory
    Naw, we'll all have Babel Fish* in our ears to translate everything! ;)

    *Reference to Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy (H2G2) by Douglas Adams.
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Agree with you about "dove". I can't recall ever hearing it used seriously as an alternative to "dived".

    That's what we say here. I have never heard "dived" other than reading it in books.
  • New question... I've read in various English books that a person "doesn't know he was born." What the heck does that mean? I kind of get the gist of it from the context, but it makes no sense to this confused 'Merican.
    :grey_question:
  • Dwi’n dysgu siarad gymraeg.
  • Golden KeyGolden Key Shipmate, Glory
    ...which means?
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Pigwidgeon wrote: »
    New question... I've read in various English books that a person "doesn't know he was born." What the heck does that mean? I kind of get the gist of it from the context, but it makes no sense to this confused 'Merican.
    :grey_question:

    I would parse that as 'You are so unaware of your favourable circumstances as to make one doubt you have actually attained sentience'.

  • Robert ArminRobert Armin Shipmate, Glory
    Elegantly put Firenze. "You don't know how lucky you are," would be another way of putting it.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited September 2019
    Dwi’n dysgu siarad gymraeg.

    Finnau hefyd

    [NEM announced they are learning to speak Welsh. I replied that I too am doing so]
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited September 2019
    Elegantly puFirenze. "You don't know how lucky you are," would be another way of putting it.

    Yes; the implication to me was always that you've had such a cushy life with so little pain that you haven't actually noticed you're alive. It's what northern relatives traditionally say after telling you they died of Spanish flu when they were 3, had to work 17 hour shifts at t'mill from the age of 9, but still fit in school and be in bed by 8 or they'd get a reet hiding and how they lived in a hole in the road covered with a cardboard sheet shared with 17 other families and there's thee hollering cause tha 'ad to work while 7 today tha doesn't know that's born...
  • Robert ArminRobert Armin Shipmate, Glory
    On the JB2 thread, mousethief said: "Apparently what's good for the goose is NOT good for the drake." On this side of the pond it would be: "Sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander". The meaning is absolutely the same; I wonder why the word changes.
  • Forthview wrote: »
    Many people now make the one word past tense to be 'sung' as in' he sung a song'.
    Tennyson does it in Mariana. ('The blue fly sung in the pane'.)

  • Tennyson came from Lincolnshire.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    [gentle hostly nudge]
    If anyone posts in a language other than English, please add a translation!
    (Thank you, KarlLB for the translation of not entirely me's post.)
    [/nudge]
    jedijudy-Heaven Host
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Drake (in British English) is a male duck, gander a male goose. (I assumed mousethief was just playing with the trope.)
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    'Gander' it says here, was a 17th C usage for 'wander aimlessly'. But in Ireland you dander, not gander.

    Does anyone still take a gander?
  • 'Take a gander' meant 'have a look' when I was growing up (in the home counties, UK).
  • On the JB2 thread, mousethief said: "Apparently what's good for the goose is NOT good for the drake." On this side of the pond it would be: "Sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander". The meaning is absolutely the same; I wonder why the word changes.
    The usual American version is, in my experience, “what’s good for the goose is good for the gander.” Given the context, like BroJames, I assumed mousethief was just playing with the saying by alluding to Dishey’s Professor Ludwig von Drake.

  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    The usual American version is, in my experience, “what’s good for the goose is good for the gander.” Given the context, like BroJames, I assumed mousethief was just playing with the saying by alluding to Dishey’s Professor Ludwig von Drake.
    I suppose this thread isn't the best place for such wordplay, since we're learning about differences in just such things.
  • Robert ArminRobert Armin Shipmate, Glory
    Ah. so the difference lies in the sauce!
  • Thanks for all the "doesn't know he was born" explanations.

    Pigwidgeon, who, being an owl, was hatched rather than born.
    :smile:
  • My husband assures me regularly that everyone in heaven speaks Vietnamese.

    I understand that English is the language of Hell. Or so he says...

    I would have guessed American.
  • Golden KeyGolden Key Shipmate, Glory
    More likely Bureaucrat-speak and Politician-speak. However, since I'm a universalist, I believe either there's no hell or no one is there. So perhaps legislative and gov't buildings with automated recordings on loudspeakers.
    ;)
  • Gramps49 wrote: »
    My husband assures me regularly that everyone in heaven speaks Vietnamese.

    I understand that English is the language of Hell. Or so he says...

    I would have guessed American.

    Ooh goody! Pond wars!
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    As may have been mentioned on this thread before, we are most anxious to avoid pond wars, or any inter-country wars at all. References to what language is spoken in the nether regions might be best avoided unless everyone can agree to treat it as a joke.
  • There is no doubt, in fact, that here in the Nether Regions we speak Dutch.
  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    I tend to put courtesy to wait staff on a par with things like thanking the bus driver. Yes, some wait staff can be a bit much at times, but for the most part they’re doing a job that, like any job requiring dealing with the public, can be challenging and for which they likely aren’t paid enough. The least I can do is smile and say “thank you” every time they check in on the table, refill my glass, etc.

    But don't you hate it when a wait person refills your wine glass without asking you first? It's our wine, it may be an expensive treat for us, we can probably only afford one bottle, so we will choose how and when we want to drink it. We don't want to be nudged into having a second bottle because you have kept on topping our glasses up before we were ready.



  • Sparrow wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    I tend to put courtesy to wait staff on a par with things like thanking the bus driver. Yes, some wait staff can be a bit much at times, but for the most part they’re doing a job that, like any job requiring dealing with the public, can be challenging and for which they likely aren’t paid enough. The least I can do is smile and say “thank you” every time they check in on the table, refill my glass, etc.

    But don't you hate it when a wait person refills your wine glass without asking you first? It's our wine, it may be an expensive treat for us, we can probably only afford one bottle, so we will choose how and when we want to drink it. We don't want to be nudged into having a second bottle because you have kept on topping our glasses up before we were ready.
    I see what you mean. But I can't remember the last time I ordered a bottle of wine in a restaurant. On the rare occasions that I order wine, I typically order it by the glass.

    But were the wait staff start to refill my glass of whatever when I would prefer they didn't, I'd have no problem gesturing with my hand and saying "I'm fine for now. Thank you, though."


  • RossweisseRossweisse Hell Host, 8th Day Host, Glory
    I agree about refilling wine glasses. (When I go out to dinner, it's usually with friends who share common tastes, so a bottle makes the best sense.) Even worse: staff who clear plates off the table as each individual finishes eating, rather than waiting until all are done. I have a dear nonagenarian friend who refuses to let them have her plate until the slowest in the company is ready. Bless her.

  • mousethief wrote: »
    Gramps49 wrote: »
    My husband assures me regularly that everyone in heaven speaks Vietnamese.

    I understand that English is the language of Hell. Or so he says...

    I would have guessed American.

    Ooh goody! Pond wars!

    The topic of this thread is that Brits and Americans don't speak the same language. The Brits did not fight a 20 year war in IndoChina, The Americans did. Thus, I would have thought the Vietnamese would think American is the language of hell.
  • Lamb ChoppedLamb Chopped Shipmate
    edited September 2019
    It's my husband saying this, people. He is obviously trying to needle his American English-speaking wife. No more than that. Sheesh.
  • Golden KeyGolden Key Shipmate, Glory
    I got it, LC. ;)
  • Gramps49 wrote: »
    The topic of this thread is that Brits and Americans don't speak the same language.
    That's a joke. A witticism. It's not that they speak two literally different languages. Clearly they don't. Get it now?
  • KarlLB wrote: »
    Dwi’n dysgu siarad gymraeg.

    Finnau hefyd

    [NEM announced they are learning to speak Welsh. I replied that I too am doing so]

    Thank you for translating!
  • Robert ArminRobert Armin Shipmate, Glory
    A small difference. 2.15 is "quarter past Two," in the UK, but "quarter after Two," in the USA.

    When I was in Australia, and talked about "half Two" folk didn't know if I meant 1.30 or 2.30. Would that also cause confusion in the States?
  • A small difference. 2.15 is "quarter past Two," in the UK, but "quarter after Two," in the USA.
    Not necessarily. I’m in the American South and am used to hearing “quarter past.”
    When I was in Australia, and talked about "half Two" folk didn't know if I meant 1.30 or 2.30. Would that also cause confusion in the States?
    Most folks here would have no idea what you’re talking about.

  • LydaLyda Shipmate
    Yes.
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