AS: 2021 America! America! God shed his grace on thee! The 2021 USA Thread

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  • MooMoo Kerygmania Host
    Hedgehog wrote: »
    I was remarkably pleased that, when the New England Confectionery Company ("Necco") went out of business and stopped making Necco Wafers, Spangler Candy bought up the brand and, remarkably, kept making the wafers by the traditional process

    Years ago I met an elderly man, an engineer, who helped design the molds for Necco wafers.

  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    Hedgehog wrote: »
    Necco Wafers are, ahem, Not For Everybody, and some people detest them in the extreme.
    The white ones made great communion wafers when we played church as kids.
  • RuthRuth Shipmate
    Graven Image now looking online to see what See's has to offer.

    See's has shops where I live; the factory is in Los Angeles. One blessed member of the church I work for gives a two-pound box of mixed chocolates to the staff in December every year.
  • @Ruth. My problem with See's or any candy for that matter is I really only want one or two pieces. I use to go into the See's shop where they always offered you a sample. I could have very well said, "Thank you, that is just what I wanted," and walked out. But of course, I bought a 1/4 lb to take home.
  • bassobasso Shipmate
    The advantage of going into the shop is that you can select only the chocolates you want to fill your box.
    I recall a couple of trips with my mom where we selected her assortment. Happy memories.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I've never tasted Necco wafers, and knowing that one of them is flavoured with wintergreen, I never shall; why would you eat something that smells like Germoline (a proprietary cream you rub on burns and scalds)?

    Ugh. :grimace:
  • Piglet wrote: »
    I've never tasted Necco wafers, and knowing that one of them is flavoured with wintergreen, I never shall; why would you eat something that smells like Germoline (a proprietary cream you rub on burns and scalds)?

    Ugh. :grimace:
    Wintergreen is a common chewing gum flavor here. I’ve never heard of Germoline, though.

  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    I had never heard of wintergreen until I lived in Canada, and we were offered these things that looked like oversized, individually wrapped Polo mints as an after-dinner sweetie. Thinking they just wrapped them differently on your side of the Pond, we tucked in with gusto ...

    Aaarrrggghhh!!! :confounded:

    My best friend loved them: she had a little glass bowl of them on a table in her hallway. <shudder>
  • The Wiki suggests there may indeed be a Pond Difference at play:
    Native Americans brewed a tea from the leaves to alleviate rheumatic symptoms, headache, fever, sore throat, and various aches and pains. . . . During the American Revolution, wintergreen leaves were used as a substitute for tea, which was scarce.

    Wintergreen is a common flavoring in American products ranging from chewing gum, mints, and candies to smokeless tobacco such as dipping tobacco (American "dip" snuff) and snus. It is a common flavoring for dental hygiene products such as mouthwash and toothpaste. It is a component of the American-origin drink root beer.
    I can’t think of any medicinal ointments scented with wintergreen here, although Pepto Bismal was originally flavored with it—both because wintergreen was an “accepted” flavor and because of the perceived medicinal value of wintergreen.

  • HedgehogHedgehog Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    The Wiki suggests there may indeed be a Pond Difference at play:
    [EDIT]Wintergreen is a common flavoring in American products ranging from chewing gum, mints, and candies to smokeless tobacco such as dipping tobacco (American "dip" snuff) and snus. [EDIT]

    "What's snu?"

    "Nothing much. What's snu with you?"

    Always go with the classics.

  • Hedgehog wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    The Wiki suggests there may indeed be a Pond Difference at play:
    [EDIT]Wintergreen is a common flavoring in American products ranging from chewing gum, mints, and candies to smokeless tobacco such as dipping tobacco (American "dip" snuff) and snus. [EDIT]

    "What's snu?"

    "Nothing much. What's snu with you?"

    Always go with the classics.
    :lol: :lol:

    FWIW, snus.

  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Piglet wrote: »
    I've never tasted Necco wafers, and knowing that one of them is flavoured with wintergreen, I never shall; why would you eat something that smells like Germoline (a proprietary cream you rub on burns and scalds)?

    Ugh. :grimace:
    Wintergreen is a common chewing gum flavor here. I’ve never heard of Germoline, though.

    Nor have I, but I imagine some people would eat it for the same reason they eat guacamole (tastes like green snot) or shrimp (have the texture of dissected fingers).
  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Piglet wrote: »
    I've never tasted Necco wafers, and knowing that one of them is flavoured with wintergreen, I never shall; why would you eat something that smells like Germoline (a proprietary cream you rub on burns and scalds)?

    Ugh. :grimace:
    Wintergreen is a common chewing gum flavor here. I’ve never heard of Germoline, though.

    Nor have I, but I imagine some people would eat it for the same reason they eat guacamole (tastes like green snot) or shrimp (have the texture of dissected fingers).
    I’m with you on guacamole. Blech!

  • However do you people know what green snot tastes like? dissected fingers ditto.
  • However do you people know what green snot tastes like? dissected fingers ditto.
    We use the imaginations God gave us. :wink:

    Shrimp, however, only tastes like dissected fingers if it’s criminally over-cooked.

  • :vomiting smiley:

    I'm outta here.
  • However do you people know what green snot tastes like? dissected fingers ditto.

    Well, I imagine that a finger tastes much like a toe.
  • Pangolin GuerrePangolin Guerre Shipmate
    edited March 2021
    .
  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    Germolene no longer smells of wintergreen, since the people who bought the company changed the formulation, and it no longer deals with the things I bought it for. See above. If I had known what they had in mind, I would have stockpiled. Old Germolene can be bought on line at grotesque prices.
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    However do you people know what green snot tastes like? dissected fingers ditto.

    I'm reminded of the line from the cult classic film Young Doctors In Love: "The body secretes seven different fluids, and I've tasted every one of them."
  • Nick Tamen wrote: »

    I've heard that before. It's why it's so difficult to market root beer in the UK; it tastes of medicine. I'm quite partial to it in small amounts, but it's not easy to buy. It was a surprise to go to the US and find it everywhere.

    The other ubiquitous American flavouring you don't find as much in the UK is cinnamon, though there's plenty in cooking. I've been known to go to a specialist shop for a cinnamon lifesaver.

  • The other ubiquitous American flavouring you don't find as much in the UK is cinnamon, though there's plenty in cooking. I've been known to go to a specialist shop for a cinnamon lifesaver.
    My wife laughed at me because when my favorite cinnamon toothpaste became hard to find in the stores, I ordered a case of it.

  • And double-posting to say I’m now sitting in the 15-minute waiting area after getting vaccine #1. Woohoo!

    I think I’ll celebrate with some Necco wafers. :grin:

  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    It's why it's so difficult to market root beer in the UK . . . it's not easy to buy. . . . The other ubiquitous American flavouring you don't find as much in the UK is cinnamon.
    On the other hand, I wouldn't know marmite from a shrimp cocktail. I loathe the latter and probably would loathe the former as well.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    ... I imagine some people would eat [Germolene] for the same reason they eat guacamole ...
    You're not meant to eat it - you rub it on cuts and burns! I'm sure there's an equivalent on your side of the Pond, but I can't think what it's called.

    The mention of root-beer may offer an explanation of my dislike: I tried in once (in the interests of research, you understand), and it had that same, horrid, medicinal smell and taste.

    I'll happily leave it for them what likes it!

    BTW, what's wrong with guacamole? A nice one is a dish fit for a king! :smiley:
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    edited March 2021
    Piglet wrote: »
    You're not meant to eat [Germolene] - you rub it on cuts and burns! I'm sure there's an equivalent on your side of the Pond, but I can't think what it's called.
    Oh, I see. But there are some people who would eat anything.

    I believe over here we have Bacitracin, Neosporin and Unguentine. Sung to the tune of Leroy Anderson's "Syncopated Clock" by a family on picnic:

    [Father] The grill was hot, I burnt my hand.
    [Daughter] And I got sunburn instead of tan.
    [Son] I scraped my knee -- boy, that was mean.
    [Mother] Thank goodness I brought Unguentine!
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    Thank you - Polysporin was the name I was trying to remember (from adverts ad nauseam when we lived in Canada). As soon as I saw "Neosporin" it came back to me.
  • Lamb ChoppedLamb Chopped Shipmate
    edited March 2021
    Wasn’t Unguentine the name of that giant spider Frodo ran into in LOTR?
  • Wasn’t Unguentine the name of that giant spider Frodo ran into in LOTR?
    You’re thinking of Ungoliant, who helped Melkor attack the Two Trees of Valinor in The Silmarillion. She then went to Middle Earth. She gave birth to the giant spiders, one of whom was Shelob, who Frodo and Sam encountered.

  • (mutters) Surely Ungoliant had a twin...
  • Nick Tamen wrote: »

    I've heard that before. It's why it's so difficult to market root beer in the UK; it tastes of medicine. I'm quite partial to it in small amounts, but it's not easy to buy. It was a surprise to go to the US and find it everywhere.

    The other ubiquitous American flavouring you don't find as much in the UK is cinnamon, though there's plenty in cooking. I've been known to go to a specialist shop for a cinnamon lifesaver.
    Are there any South Asian and/or Afro-Caribbean food shops locally? They normally have things like root beer and interesting toothpaste. I keep planning to visit the fruit and vegetable shop en route to school that also does American sweets, but I will need to do that sans Dragonlets.
  • When the first McDonald's opened in London's West End they sold root beer. I used to reckon it was one of the few reasons to buy food there , but I was often in a minority of one. I don't like coca cola and the orange is too sweet. It was most disappointing to find it no longer on the menu when I revisited the Golden Arches after a long break.
  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    I've seen it in Sainsburys on the world food aisle. And something called root beer in the soft drinks aisle in Waitrose. I noticed it because my friend had been in the USA and had some. But the Waitrose stuff was made by Bunderberg, so not American.
  • I normally drink tap water, not soft drinks at home. I'm not going to seek it out. It was just something to have at McDonald's when dragged there, because their coffee isn't great and I don't like burgers, but they do have WiFi.
  • Penny S wrote: »
    I've seen it in Sainsburys on the world food aisle. And something called root beer in the soft drinks aisle in Waitrose. I noticed it because my friend had been in the USA and had some. But the Waitrose stuff was made by Bunderberg, so not American.

    Bundaberg manufacture ginger beer and sarsparilla, so I suspect that this may be one or the other re-labelled. Mrs BA and I have visited the brewery, where the visitors' centre staff at the time were a double act worthy of a music hall stage. Had us and other visitors in stitiches.
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    Sarsaparilla is very similar in taste to root beer, but not made from the same ingredients.
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited March 2021
    Piglet wrote: »
    I've never tasted Necco wafers, and knowing that one of them is flavoured with wintergreen, I never shall; why would you eat something that smells like Germoline (a proprietary cream you rub on burns and scalds)?

    Ugh. :grimace:
    Looping back to this, and fwiw, I was reminded as I enjoyed Necco wafers after my shot the other day that the flavors of Necco wafers are very subtle. That’s one thing some of us love about them and others don’t like. Not surprisingly for a candy created in 1847, before the advent of so many artificial flavors, they don’t have the in-your-face flavors that so many other candies have, and they have no scent. So the wintergreen ones taste just the slightest bit minty, and the licorice ones have just a hint of licorice flavor, not a strong flavor. So you might not find the wintergreen ones as off-putting as you think.

    And @Amanda B Reckondwyth, I’ve known of a number Catholic churches that have used Necco wafers (of any color) with kids practicing for their First Communion.

  • Sarsaparilla is very similar in taste to root beer, but not made from the same ingredients.

    It seems they are now," Sarsaparilla and Root Beer were founded by the Native Americans before arriving in Europe. Both beverages are named after their distinct differences in ingredients when they were first made. Sarsaparilla was made from the Sarsaparilla vine, while Root Beer, roots of the sassafras tree. These days, Root Beer recipes do not include sassafras as the plant has been found to cause serious health issues. The vine was banned by the American Food and Drug Administration for commercial food production in 1960."

  • Pendragon wrote: »
    ...I've heard that before. It's why it's so difficult to market root beer in the UK; it tastes of medicine. I'm quite partial to it in small amounts, but it's not easy to buy. It was a surprise to go to the US and find it everywhere.
    ...
    Are there any South Asian and/or Afro-Caribbean food shops locally? They normally have things like root beer and interesting toothpaste. I keep planning to visit the fruit and vegetable shop en route to school that also does American sweets, but I will need to do that sans Dragonlets.
    Yes, but not close by and I've never known them to stock root beer, whereas there is an American section in my local small Sainsbury's that keeps me in canned pumpkin and the occasional Reece's peanut butter cup.
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    Phoenix will be seeing its first 90 degree days this week. I've been sleeping with the window open. Had the fan on last night. No A/C yet.
  • Phoenix will be seeing its first 90 degree days this week. I've been sleeping with the window open. Had the fan on last night. No A/C yet.

    I wish I could, but if I leave my windows open every grain of pollen in the state of Arizona flies in and I start sniffing, sneezing, and scratching my eyes.
    :cry:
  • I didn't realize pneumonia results in serious brain fog and minor aphasia. This sucks. Fortunately, the cuss words still work.
    I am sending LL back to Minneapolis to school, God help him. Pray for him?
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    Here's hoping the fog lifts and the aphasia disappears. Prayers for LL. I'm sure his mother instilled in him the good sense of how to stay safe.

    Church resumed today, Easter Sunday, They hadn't been worshipping in person since Epiphany. Service in the courtyard, reasonably well attended although several empty chairs. Reservations were required, so I assume they knew how many chairs to set out. Don't know why there were no-shows. Mostly old standby hymns: "Jesus Christ is Risen Today" of course, but also "Softly and Tenderly Jesus Is Calling". It was good to receive communion again after so long a hiatus.
  • Lamb Chopped, sorry about the after fog, prayers you will be back to clarity soon. Miss Amandy how wonderful to be back among the community gathered. We are still on line.
  • Pneumonia is a sod of a thing, I seem to recall being unable to negotiate doorways.
    Or talk sense.
  • That's me!

    I am glad to have an explanation for what feels like incipient Alzheimer's.
  • jedijudyjedijudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    (((Lamb Chopped))) Yup. Pneumonia is from the devil. The brain fog is real and can really cause us to do things we would never do while in our right minds.

    One of the times I had pneumonia a couple of years ago, I made the very bad decision to go ahead and fly to the opposite side of the country instead of staying home...or going to the hospital like my doctor wanted me to do. All because the ticket was already paid for. There was insurance, but that never penetrated the fog.
  • Yikes. This is so weird. Ive put my classes on hold so as not to freak out my students. I can't eve pronoune pneumonia right, it keeps coming out something like pseudopocomonas. And I'm pretty sure I had it a month ago and they missed it, taking it for an asthma attack. But it never got better.
  • Last April I had what seemed to be a minor cold, when on morning Day 3 I discovered that I had no balance. That scared the hell out of me. My breathing was shallow, I had headache and then vomiting. I was tested for Covid, and it was negative. The symptoms cleared in about a week, but the brain fog last 6-8 weeks. That also scared the hell out of me, the more so as I live alone.
  • Amanda B ReckondwythAmanda B Reckondwyth Mystery Worship Editor
    I get occasional bouts of vertigo. I think it's Meniere's Disease but it's never been officially diagnosed.

    The worst bout of it occurred a few years ago. I couldn't get my balance and felt nauseous. I had a cold sweat. I went to the hospital, and they subjected me to a battery of tests but found nothing. The next day I felt much better and went home.

    My mother suffered from vertigo too, but in her case the optometrist was able to correct it via glasses.
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