Serving the green owl: any Duolinguists on board?

I signed up with Duolingo a few years ago, used it for a while, and then gave up.

During the current lockdown have been back on it. I've hopped between languages a lot, but at the moment I am mostly doing Italian - I'd like to visit, one day, covid permitting.

Today I learned the sentence "Lo mangerei solo se stessi per morire di fame" (I would only eat it if I were about to die of hunger) - NOT a sentence I expect to use in Italy!

What are you learning on Duolingo? What is your streak? What do you find good or bad about it? What bizarre sentences have you come across? And how is the green owl guilt-tripping you today?
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Comments

  • MiffyMiffy Shipmate
    Oh guilt, guilt! I’ve barely visited the green owl since last summer, and that was only briefly before our holiday fell victim to Covid cancellations. I’m signed up for French, Latin, Italian and Welsh. In reality I only use French; and that’s only to brush up my spoken language gained from many years of learning both at school and from some years we spent living in France.

    Poor Duo seems to have given up on me; maybe he’s finally realised that I don’t respond to emotional blackmail.

    But yes, when I do use the app, I have a sense of smug satisfaction charging my way up the league tables and proving my old French teacher (RIP) wrong in her gloomy predictions.

    I love the weird sentences. I do have some quibbles with the Owl for insisting that some answers are incorrect, though, when I know they’re not!

    I might just pop my head round the door and see what’s changed in Duolingo land since Lockdown.

    Half a sec...you’re not Duo Owl himself, are you, coming to guilt-trip me into returning?
  • "Your Cow is Pretty"= some sentences are odd.
  • MiffyMiffy Shipmate
    Ok, I’ve reached Level 5 ‘Travel,’ (you can live in hopes) and have completed a story, ‘Clothes for my Holidays,’ (again, chance would be a fine thing). Breaking news: Lucie has bought a pair of green shorts and some white boots. Poor Lily, the shop assistant, is knackered and in need of a holiday herself after all the fetching and carrying. I feel the same.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited March 8
    "Your Cow is Pretty"= some sentences are odd.

    You think?

    Yn y Duolingo Gymraeg, mae dyn o'r enw Owen. Mae o'n hoff iawn o bannas. O, ac mae draig yn fy ngardd i...

    (In the Welsh Duolingo, there's a man called Owen. He's very fond of parsnips. Oh, and there's a dragon in my garden)
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Ich spiele gerne mit der grünen Eule. Wir spielen jeden Tag zusammen.

    (I enjoy playing with the green owl. We play together every day.)

    🇩🇪

    I’m up to level 5 family 4. Pearl league.
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    I've been doing Duolingo Italian also, since last spring! On Level ... 4 now, I think? I'm not doing as much as I was doing last year when there was less going on, but I do have a 290 day streak.
  • edited March 9
    My streaks are up to 4 days. I'm also finding that I disagree with some translations in French and German. Duo doesn't help with what I need most: confidence in speaking. I hear these languages okay and read reasonably but can't talk confidently. Also noting that they don't have Canadian French and my family's Frisian influenced German makes things hard. We were disappointed that Cree wasn't added, it's the largest indigenous language in Canada. We understood they did Klingon instead, which may be inaccurate.
  • I got frustrated with Duo when the Vietnamese my husband taught me didn't match up with the (one true) way Duo had it. I kept getting dinged, apparently for being too idiomatic. And the guilt tripping, dear Lord, the guilt tripping.
  • MiffyMiffy Shipmate
    KarlLB wrote: »
    "Your Cow is Pretty"= some sentences are odd.

    You think?

    Yn y Duolingo Gymraeg, mae dyn o'r enw Owen. Mae o'n hoff iawn o bannas. O, ac mae draig yn fy ngardd i...

    (In the Welsh Duolingo, there's a man called Owen. He's very fond of parsnips. Oh, and there's a dragon in my garden)

    Yay! Go Owen!

    Miffy, Welsh Level 0 and wondering how a detailed knowledge of dragons and parsnips will help her on her occasional trips on the Welsh Railway.

    French Ruby League, she says casually...😁

  • Miffy wrote: »
    Half a sec...you’re not Duo Owl himself, are you, coming to guilt-trip me into returning?

    ... Maybe........

    Welsh is one of my other Duo languages, although I am very inconsistent with it. I'd wondered what was up with all the parsnips.

  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Miffy wrote: »
    Half a sec...you’re not Duo Owl himself, are you, coming to guilt-trip me into returning?

    ... Maybe........

    Welsh is one of my other Duo languages, although I am very inconsistent with it. I'd wondered what was up with all the parsnips.

    Lockdown? Makes people go funny.
  • SarasaSarasa Shipmate
    I have a 1000 plus streak (I'm a bit of an obsessive). I finished the Italian course, but need to revisit it. I'm not sure when I'm ever going to use 'The children write on the shark'. I find the French course better. Not quite so many odd sentences and it helps by popping up the possible spellings.
    I tried Latin but the voice was so dismal I gave up.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    I like the reminders, they make sure I do at least some each day. Some days I’m really competitive and work to be top of my league. Some days I keep at it until I run out of hearts. Other days I just save my streak.

    I really like the stories, they test my understanding.

    I’m on a 268 day streak.

    I always mend my eggs, I hate cracked eggs.

    :) 🦉
  • Jane RJane R Shipmate
    edited March 9
    I finished the French and German courses when I was doing it regularly, a couple of years ago (brushing up on school languages). I was also working my way through Welsh and Spanish, but hadn't got very far.

    The interesting thing was the sample sentences at each level focused on different aspects of daily life. The French course was obsessed with clothes and food (and going for rides in someone else's voiture). The German course was all about business, science and Kultur. The Welsh, meanwhile, taught handy phrases such as "Which way to the nightclub?" and more than you will ever need to say about parsnips and carrots.

    I haven't had time to do Duolingo for a while - I've been busy working.
  • 516 day streak. I'm learning Scottish Gaelic and brushing up my school Latin and French.

    I completed the first Gaelic course, and am working through the new extended course, but I'm still a long way from any sort of proficiency.

    French and Latin have come as a nice surprise. Prior to starting Duo I'd have said that I had forgotten everything I learned at school but apparently not. Every so often I get e-mails in French; prior to starting Duo I always clicked the "translate" option but now I'm reading them in French.

  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    I feel like any learning of Italian I'm doing on Duo is definitely more of a brain exercise than leading to any actual useful facility with the language, but as a brain exercise, it is enjoyable. I was thinking of tackling Welsh once I finish Italian, although I find it much more daunting -- in Italian, I've found that my schooldays knowledge of French has made it much easier, while Welsh seems like there will be no points of familiarity at all.

    I have a former student who runs a small Italian bistro here in town, and I follow their Facebook page. The other day they made a post to let people know that although there's a For Sale on their building, the bistro is staying open. The post (in English) ended with "Saremo ancora qui per te" and at first my eyes just kind of glossed over that, oh, nice, they put an Italian sentence at the end of the post. Then I looked at it a second time and read it as "We will still be here for you" and thought, "I guess I have been learning a little from Duolingo after all!"
  • SandemaniacSandemaniac Shipmate
    I wonder if they have a Doric course? @NEQ, I'm looking at you here!
  • PriscillaPriscilla Shipmate
    Another one for Welsh.
    Owen must be fed up of parsnips, and I can’t think of any occasion when I want to tell people “Draig dw i” - I am a dragon.
  • PriscillaPriscilla Shipmate
    (Should have said - I am doing a Welsh course on line and my previous tutor recommended Duolingo. The best thing is that it encourages you to do a little every day.)
  • AravisAravis Shipmate
    I started Arabic last year. It was very difficult. I kept going for a few months but got discouraged when I couldn’t make sense of what seemed to be some inconsistent results, and the comments board stated that some of the lessons were inaccurate.
    I might go back to it soon as I urgently need to use up bits of spare annual leave before the end of March. It doesn’t look as if we’ll be allowed to travel for exercise for some time yet and we won’t have moved house by then, so I may be looking for something to do with my time!
  • I think that's one of its great strengths, the fact that it encourages frequent, bite-sized practice.

    I'd like it if it were possible to repeat lessons - literally to do the exact same lesson over again, whichever and whenever I want.

    On the mobile app, some languages have little explainers, teaching you the grammar, before the exercises, but the Welsh one doesn't. Although I think it does on the computer version?
  • I was doing OK with Polish until it started hitting me with 'question' words (how, why etc) which decline in case, number and gender. Sometimes the declension has them looking completely unlike you thought they looked like in their nom. masc. sing. form. Enough was enough :smile:

    I might have another go but I'll need to start again from the start, I think. I've been 6 months away from it.
  • DiomedesDiomedes Shipmate
    I've been doing Duolingo Irish. Little and often is the only way for me - and occasionally to go back a level and revise vocabulary. The spelling in Irish is a real challenge. My pronunciation has been helped by listening to TG4 (the Irish language TV channel), often with subtitles which give the brain a nudge in the right direction. I do wonder though when I'm going to have cause to say 'There's a man in the fridge!'.
  • Diomedes wrote: »
    I do wonder though when I'm going to have cause to say 'There's a man in the fridge!'.

    Well, obviously the next time Boris Johnson has difficult questions to answer

  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    I think that's one of its great strengths, the fact that it encourages frequent, bite-sized practice.

    I'd like it if it were possible to repeat lessons - literally to do the exact same lesson over again, whichever and whenever I want.

    On the mobile app, some languages have little explainers, teaching you the grammar, before the exercises, but the Welsh one doesn't. Although I think it does on the computer version?

    Ydy/yes, it does.
  • orfeoorfeo Suspended
    edited March 9
    I've done the whole Danish course. And a fair chunk of the German course (actually where I started), and dabbled in some others. Not using it currently.

    I think it's pretty good, although not perhaps quite as good as it was some years ago, and the quality of the courses does vary a little - I actually think the Danish one is better than several others I've tried.

    The bizarre sentences are a hoot, but over time I realised they do have a point. I think the Duolingo strategy of alternating between teaching you vocabulary and teaching you grammar is quite clever and effective. I never thought in my first few months of Danish that there was any point to me learning a sentence about a turtle eating a strawberry, but lo and behold when I was in Copenhagen I recognised the words for "turtle" and "strawberry" in a couple of separate contexts and was quite excited that I already recognised them on sight. And I already could grasp basic sentence structure of verbs versus nouns.

    EDIT: As for developing facility, I went and found an actual Danish teacher after finishing the course, and she was a bit stunned at how much I already knew. In her experience most people who said they'd learned on the internet knew very little. With me she realised she could skip the basic lessons.
  • orfeoorfeo Suspended
    Addendum: I used to share some of the best sentences on Facebook. My friends loved it, and at least a couple of them started using Duolingo themselves as a result. One friend restarted learning Russian and ultimately went to an intensive course in St Petersburg.
  • 'Shit Duolingo Says' on Twitter is good for the bizarre sentences
  • orfeoorfeo Suspended
    Late in the Danish course you get:

    Min datter døde og blev til en zombie som prøvede at spise min hjerne.

    My daughter died and became a zombie that tried to eat my brain.
  • kingsfoldkingsfold Shipmate
    Please tell me one of the courses teaches you to say, "My hovercraft is full of eels."
  • orfeoorfeo Suspended
    ROFL. Now I want to know as well.
  • It would have to be Hungarian...
  • orfeoorfeo Suspended
    Which is still stuck in Beta I think.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Today I learned -

    “Does a fly have a neck?”

    and

    “Those are not my fingers.”

    🤔😏
  • I need Verb Drills. Old fashioned "amo amas amat amamus amatis amant" verb drills. You can't string a bloody sentence together without them and Spanish is like Russian: they have two past conjugations and some amorphous rules for each, which I am not going to learn just by listening.

    I want to make a verb drill app - a game, even, because I haven't found one worth its salt anywhere, yet.

    Recommendations welcome.

    AFF
  • MiffyMiffy Shipmate
    Waiter, this beer is green!
  • gustavagustava Shipmate Posts: 28
    For suggestions of verb drills etc, you could try asking int the Duolingo facebook group for the language involved - people are pretty good at sharing ideas and links on them I've found
  • Diomedes wrote: »
    I've been doing Duolingo Irish. Little and often is the only way for me - and occasionally to go back a level and revise vocabulary. The spelling in Irish is a real challenge. My pronunciation has been helped by listening to TG4 (the Irish language TV channel), often with subtitles which give the brain a nudge in the right direction. I do wonder though when I'm going to have cause to say 'There's a man in the fridge!'.

    I'm doing the Irish course, but am a neophyte with some 40 days under my belt. Not sure that much is going in and connecting the spelling and the pronunciation is proving difficult. Unfortunately, due to the ancient split of the Celtic languages into p- and q- variants, my knowledge of Welsh is no use at all. Perhaps brezhoneg (Breton) next?
  • DiomedesDiomedes Shipmate
    Rev per Minute - my reason for trying to learn at least a smattering of Irish is because my main hobby is playing Irish traditional music. I was ridiculously proud to find myself understanding tune title and place names! Every little helps!
  • My streak is now 520 days - I was awarded 52 lingots. I have amassed 2442 ingots, but have nothing to spend them on.

    Anyone else sitting on a large pile of lingots?
  • MiffyMiffy Shipmate
    Mine are relatively modest. 118.
  • Over 21000! I only spend them on refilling my hearts if I make too many mistakes in a lesson
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    Over 21000! I only spend them on refilling my hearts if I make too many mistakes in a lesson

    Same here, I’ve got 9164 💎

  • AravisAravis Shipmate
    There are verb drills among the many language quizzes on Sporcle, but I don’t know whether they would be the verbs (or indeed the languages) that you want. Worth a look though.
  • Aravis wrote: »
    There are verb drills among the many language quizzes on Sporcle, but I don’t know whether they would be the verbs (or indeed the languages) that you want. Worth a look though.

    Running over to Sporcle. Thanks!

    AFF
  • orfeoorfeo Suspended
    Danish verb forms are the same for 1st, 2nd and 3rd person singular and plural.

    That was very pleasing news when I first found out.
  • BoogieBoogie Shipmate
    I’m second in the Obsidian league. I had to Google Obsidian!

    :lol:
  • PriscillaPriscilla Shipmate
    I’m in the obsidian league for Welsh and starting to get beyond what I’ve learned in class. It’s interesting to see how the top scares have decreased as time has gone on - perhaps other learners are finding it the same?
  • PriscillaPriscilla Shipmate
    (Showing off) I’m actually in the diamond league.
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