Proof Americans and Brits speak a different language

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  • I think it may vary. But alterations are made on a variety of European words. E.g., Porsche cars are pronounced (approx.) in German as "POR-shuh". Americans often say "PORSH". French words are complicated to figure out, due to the complicated endings.
  • @Gill H

    A general thing. I hate it. I first met calzone in Italy, and was miffed when I returned to the States and it had followed me there, and lost the final vowel. I still make a point of saying it with three syllables when ordering in restaurants. I've never had it as good here, although I've made it where it was nearly as good as I remember. Nobody uses enough cheese.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    KarlLB wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    While we're here. There's a thread currently called "Bung a Bob for Big Ben Bong." I understand Big Ben, and I understand the bong=ring, and a bob is a unit of coinage. What's "bung"?

    Chuck. Lob. Also often used of bribes, generally as a noun.

    Thank you. I'd have thought that a bung was the stopper in a barrel, and the same word used as a verb was to close a hole tightly.
  • EirenistEirenist Shipmate
    Porsche. A down-and-out called at a big house, just as the owner was going out. 'Got any odd-jobs I ciuld do for you, sir?' 'I'd like my porch painted, I've got some yellow paint, and a brush, in the garage.' When he came back, the man was waiting, but the porch seemed untouched. 'I've done the painting, sir, like you said. But it isn't a Porsche, it's a Ferrari. You should have had it painted red.'
    I'll get my coat.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Gee D wrote: »
    KarlLB wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    While we're here. There's a thread currently called "Bung a Bob for Big Ben Bong." I understand Big Ben, and I understand the bong=ring, and a bob is a unit of coinage. What's "bung"?

    Chuck. Lob. Also often used of bribes, generally as a noun.

    Thank you. I'd have thought that a bung was the stopper in a barrel, and the same word used as a verb was to close a hole tightly.
    Yes. It can be used that way as in, ‘bung up that hole will you’, or (having a cold), ‘I’m all bunged up.’
  • Bung, as in bunged up means constipated here.
  • Slightly off track, a Glaswegian friend once advised me that a certain Italian soup is pronounced mine-strone, i.e. only two syllables.
  • Ewww, re mine-strone. IME, Mih-nuh-STROH-nee.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Bung, as in bunged up means constipated here.

    As it does here. In that context.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Bung, as in bunged up means constipated here.

    A variation on my closing a hole tightly.
  • KarlLB wrote: »
    Bung, as in bunged up means constipated here.

    As it does here. In that context.

    I have never heard that use.
  • Very common in the UK. Also, when you've got a bad cold and can't breathe.
  • In the US, difficulty breathing due to a cold affecting your nose is generally some variation of "stuffed", "stuffy", or "blocked": "My nose is all stuffed up"; "I have a stuffy nose"; or "My nose is all blocked up".

    IME. YMMV.
  • In the UK those words are rather different:
    Stuffed - vulgar for being full of food, really vulgar for being outwitted, manoeuvred as in "they were absolutely stuffed"
    Stuffy - airless, stale atmosphere; old-fashioned
    Blocked - prevented, prohibited.
  • Stuffed does mean full of food here (I live in western Canadian prairies). It's not vulgar.
    Stuffed up means nose plugged.
    Stuffy means both that you need to open a window to get some air, and pretentious.

    Stuffed it - means you missed a shot in a sport, e.g., hockey, curling, possibly soccer
    Muffed it means you "bobbled" it and did not take the shot.
    to deke is to feint right or left to go around someone in a sport, and also used to describe "stick handling" around issues and obstacles for a work task.
    Muff is also rude slang for what I understand is called "fanny" in the UK, what children may call "front bummy" here.
  • In the UK those words are rather different:
    Stuffed - vulgar for being full of food, really vulgar for being outwitted, manoeuvred as in "they were absolutely stuffed"
    Stuffy - airless, stale atmosphere; old-fashioned
    Blocked - prevented, prohibited.

    I shouldn't have said that 'stuffed' in the sense of being full was particularly vulgar in the UK, and is heard fairly frequently.

    'We're stuffed' meaning 'we're in somewhat of a tricky situation' seems to me to be equally mild, given that I suspect it's a euphemism for the much more coarse 'we're f****d'. Similarly 'Get stuffed,' is a milder version of 'F*** off'
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    Indeed. Neither usage comes over to me as in the least bit vulgar.
  • PigletPiglet All Saints Host, Circus Host
    "We got stuffed" was a frequent Saturday afternoon refrain from D., when Ipswich Town Football Club were outplayed by their opponents. :(
  • TrudyTrudy Heaven Host, 8th Day Host
    Does anywhere else in the world say "stogged" instead of "stuffed" for being full after eating a meal? It's common usage here in Newfoundland (to the point that at one point there was a pizza place called Stoggers) but I don't think I've heard anyone else use it.
  • No "stogged" in the PNW.
  • What's PNW?

    Does "fed up" mean "at the end of tolerance" to you? Also same meaning to "at the end of my rope", "have given all the f*cks I have to give".

    If something is worn out and unfixable we say "it's toast". Does that play elsewhere?
  • What's PNW?

    Does "fed up" mean "at the end of tolerance" to you? Also same meaning to "at the end of my rope", "have given all the f*cks I have to give".

    If something is worn out and unfixable we say "it's toast". Does that play elsewhere?

    Sorry, Pacific Northwest. Part of the continent where I reside. Yes, "I'm fed up with you" means "I've had about as much of you as I can stand."

    "End of my rope" to me can mean that, or can mean my endurance or strength are running out. The one about giving f*cks just means I don't care anymore, especially if caring about this one thing has lasted a long time and booted me nothing. "It's toast" means it's done for. You can also say "we're toast" meaning "our current cause is a lost one" or "the existentially bad thing is about to happen to us." For instance, "If Trump is reelected, we're toast" spoken by someone in a group Trump supporters would like to annihilate.
  • DooneDoone Shipmate
    Yes, I recognise all those uses (I’m in SW England), though I would usually say ‘I’m at the end of my tether’ rather than rope.
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    'Tethers End' rather a good name for a house.

    Beatrice. I am stuffed, cousin; I cannot smell.

    Margaret. A maid, and stuffed! there's goodly catching of cold.


    Much Ado About Nothing. Act III, Sc 4
  • Nick TamenNick Tamen Shipmate
    edited February 1
    mousethief wrote: »
    No "stogged" in the PNW.
    And neither “stogged” nor “bung”/“bunged” in the American South, at least not that I can ever recall hearing.

  • EirenistEirenist Shipmate
    From memory, 'stogged' is used in the firth chapter of Joyce's 'Ulysses'. Possibly a Dublin word?
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    Eirenist wrote: »
    Porsche. A down-and-out called at a big house, just as the owner was going out. 'Got any odd-jobs I ciuld do for you, sir?' 'I'd like my porch painted, I've got some yellow paint, and a brush, in the garage.' When he came back, the man was waiting, but the porch seemed untouched. 'I've done the painting, sir, like you said. But it isn't a Porsche, it's a Ferrari. You should have had it painted red.'
    I'll get my coat.

    That rated a triple groan from my wife with one awful thrown in.
  • Eirenist wrote: »
    From memory, 'stogged' is used in the firth chapter of Joyce's 'Ulysses'. Possibly a Dublin word?

    That's the chapter about an inlet in Scotland?
  • Hey British peoples. A Brit person speaking of a photograph of two men said, "Look your jumpers." I know what jumpers are. What does that locution mean? Look at? I like the look of? Wot?
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited February 1
    mousethief wrote: »
    Hey British peoples. A Brit person speaking of a photograph of two men said, "Look your jumpers." I know what jumpers are. What does that locution mean? Look at? I like the look of? Wot?

    Doesn't mean anything to me. Did you mishear?

    Unless the intonation was "look! Your jumpers!" implying the addressee possessed identical knitwear.
  • I am very likely to mishear because of my hearing loss, which I will cop to, but this was in print.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    mousethief wrote: »
    I am very likely to mishear because of my hearing loss, which I will cop to, but this was in print.

    Weird. Makes no more sense to me than it does to you.
  • Gramps49Gramps49 Shipmate
    edited February 2
    Jumpers? Could be a dress? Or even a sweater?

    The word "jumper" when used to mean a sweater comes from an obsolete term for a large, loose men's jacket called a jump. ... The terminology can be confusing because a jumper is also a sleeveless dress worn over a shirt or a one-piece article of clothing for a small child in both British and American English.
  • Gramps49 wrote: »
    ...a one-piece article of clothing for a small child in both British and American English.

    That would be a jumpsuit in my experience of British English.

  • orfeoorfeo Shipmate
    edited February 2
    Gramps49 wrote: »
    Jumpers? Could be a dress? Or even a sweater?

    The word "jumper" when used to mean a sweater comes from an obsolete term for a large, loose men's jacket called a jump. ... The terminology can be confusing because a jumper is also a sleeveless dress worn over a shirt or a one-piece article of clothing for a small child in both British and American English.

    The question wasn't about the word "jumpers". Mousethief explicitly said that. It was about what on earth "Look your jumpers" meant.

    To which none of us have any idea.
  • Probably a derogatory comment, as in “imagine wearing jumpers like these!” Though, and the context might tell, it could be admiration. “Look at your jumpers, [how stylish].” Or maybe they were full of holes or were Christmas jumpers of the worst kind.
  • EirenistEirenist Shipmate
    Probably 'Look! Your jumpers!' No idea what would have been odd about them?
  • Might it have been an exhortation to members of a new religious group? "Look, you jumpers, for ahead lies the promised land of Trampoline!"
  • ROTFL
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    Wasn't there a Monty Python sketch about an order of trampolining nuns?
  • PigwidgeonPigwidgeon Shipmate
    edited February 2
    Firenze wrote: »
    Wasn't there a Monty Python sketch about an order of trampolining nuns?
    It seems to have been Peter Cooke and Dudley Moore:
    The Leaping Nuns of Norwich


  • What more proof do you need?

    Someone earlier said that in the UK a jumper was a knitted garment for a small child. In my experience there is no age restriction; at this time of year I'm often wearing a jumper.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    A good jumper is sartorial comfort food.
  • A good jumper should win the Gold Cup at Cheltenham.
  • Perhaps it's from an unpublished Shakespearean play?

    King {rising from throne and bellowing}: "Look you, jumpers! Stop thy dancing whilst I speak! Particularly you, Jester, with thine bells!"
  • Golden Key wrote: »
    Perhaps it's from an unpublished Shakespearean play?

    King {rising from throne and bellowing}: "Look you, jumpers!

    Welsh King, is he then?
  • As John Lennon said, "oompa, oompa, stick it up your jumper."
  • FirenzeFirenze Shipmate, Host Emeritus
    mousethief wrote: »
    As John Lennon said, "oompa, oompa, stick it up your jumper."

    He wasn't the first: it was a playground chant when I was a child.
  • Golden Key wrote: »
    Perhaps it's from an unpublished Shakespearean play?

    King {rising from throne and bellowing}: "Look you, jumpers!

    Welsh King, is he then?

    Which bit of that signals Welsh, please?
  • Firenze wrote: »
    mousethief wrote: »
    As John Lennon said, "oompa, oompa, stick it up your jumper."

    He wasn't the first: it was a playground chant when I was a child.

    I think now I remember reading that.
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