Rossweisse
RIP Rossweisse, HellHost and long-time Shipmate.
Please see the thread in All Saints remembering her.

Proof Americans and Brits speak a different language

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Comments

  • "siv" for me also.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Golden Key wrote: »
    "Siv" is the one I know. Might be a regional difference.

    Yes - as in so many instances, there may well not be just the one pronunciation throughout the country.
  • Could also be that English isn't the person's first language, and they're pronouncing by the rules of that language.
  • KarlLBKarlLB Shipmate
    edited October 17
    Golden Key wrote: »
    Could also be that English isn't the person's first language, and they're pronouncing by the rules of that language.

    Or has learnt the rules of English pronunciation, where it would actually be expected to be 'seev'

    Most other languages with a Latin alphabet would expect to pronounce the final 'e'. (Yes, French, I know, didn't mean you! You don't usually pronounce a final *anything*)

    There is a saying that one should never disparage someone who mispronounces a word because it probably means they learnt it through reading.
  • KarlLB wrote: »
    Most other languages with a Latin alphabet would expect to pronounce the final 'e'. (Yes, French, I know, didn't mean you! You don't usually pronounce a final *anything*)
    Except when singing in French. Then all kinds of final letters and syllables that might be silent in spoken French find voice.

  • Short siv for me.
    What about south? It's a short 'uh' for that but its a pig -like "sow" with south with some.
  • Always “Sowth” here, i.e., the American South. I’m not sure I’ve heard anything else very often, except perhaps something that sounds somewhere between “sowth” and “soath” (rhyme with “soap”).

    Meanwhile, “siv” here.

  • Wow. I've never heard "seeve" - do you know where this person was from?
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    ‘Sowth’ but ‘sutherly’.
  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    KarlLB wrote: »
    Most other languages with a Latin alphabet would expect to pronounce the final 'e'. (Yes, French, I know, didn't mean you! You don't usually pronounce a final *anything*)
    Except when singing in French. Then all kinds of final letters and syllables that might be silent in spoken French find voice.

    And vice versa.
  • Short siv for me.
    What about south? It's a short 'uh' for that but its a pig -like "sow" with south with some.

    Always sowth to me.
  • la vie en rougela vie en rouge Circus Host, 8th Day Host
    Final letters are not pronounced in French, unless you are in certain parts of the South. In foie gras land, what is a pain au chocolat anywhere else is a chocolatine, with the final 'e' proudly pronounced. The final 'e' of Toulouse is also very much pronounced by the people who live there.

    (I haven't watched Emily in Paris, but apparently one of it's innumerable howlers is the use of the term chocolatine. They are only ever called that in the South.)
  • Final letters are not pronounced in French, unless you are in certain parts of the South. In foie gras land, what is a pain au chocolat anywhere else is a chocolatine, with the final 'e' proudly pronounced. The final 'e' of Toulouse is also very much pronounced by the people who live there.

    (I haven't watched Emily in Paris, but apparently one of it's innumerable howlers is the use of the term chocolatine. They are only ever called that in the South.)

    I have heard final letters pronounced in songs by Jacques Brel and Francoise Hardy. Particularly terminal "e"s to fill out scansion.
  • Lowering the tone of the discussion to my own level, I found everything was different in Texas. I particularly liked their version of 'vehicle', which comes out as 'vee-hickle'. The gap they sometimes put between syllables can be good for emphasis, 'bull-shit' being particularly effective, and especially when the second word is stretched into 'shi-it'.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Always “Sowth” here, i.e., the American South. I’m not sure I’ve heard anything else very often, except perhaps something that sounds somewhere between “sowth” and “soath” (rhyme with “soap”).

    Meanwhile, “siv” here.

    Sowth and siv here.
  • cgichardcgichard Shipmate
    I've never heard "seeve" - do you know where this person was from?
    Bio says he's a native Southern Californian; currently resident in Riverside. Post-doc. studies at Univ. Of Durham, UK. but he wouldn't have learned "seeve" there.

  • I grew up there, and we called it a colander. It may be that he's adapted enough to his new surroundings to know to use "sieve," but has only met the word in print.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    I grew up there, and we called it a colander. It may be that he's adapted enough to his new surroundings to know to use "sieve," but has only met the word in print.

    I'd say that a sieve and a colander are different. A sieve is often smallish, may be larger, but always has a fine mesh for straining. A colander is usually larger, and instead of being mesh is a pressed sheet of metal, probably stainless steel these days, with larger holes, holes that are smaller than peas or dried beans, but too big for rice.
  • BroJamesBroJames Purgatory Host, 8th Day Host
    Sieve
    Colander
    (In U.K. terms) both also available in plastic.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Good clear photos. I've seen plastic sieves, but not colanders until now.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    BroJames wrote: »
    Sieve
    Colander

    (In U.K. terms) both also available in plastic.
    Yes. That's how I understand the two words.

  • Penny SPenny S Shipmate
    And there are tales of people leaving their plastic colander on the pan over the gas and having melted plastic as a result. Metal ones could be used as steamers.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    If it melts in long thin threads, you can always turn it into a batch of spag bol.
  • mousethief wrote: »
    Final letters are not pronounced in French, unless you are in certain parts of the South. In foie gras land, what is a pain au chocolat anywhere else is a chocolatine, with the final 'e' proudly pronounced. The final 'e' of Toulouse is also very much pronounced by the people who live there.

    (I haven't watched Emily in Paris, but apparently one of it's innumerable howlers is the use of the term chocolatine. They are only ever called that in the South.)

    I have heard final letters pronounced in songs by Jacques Brel and Francoise Hardy. Particularly terminal "e"s to fill out scansion.
    Yes, as I said, sung French can be different, as final “e”s or other syllables that might be silent otherwise often get notes of their own, requiring them to be pronounced.

    And yes, a sieve and a colander are two different things here.

  • DafydDafyd Shipmate
    French poetry is scanned as if the final e is pronounced.
  • Yeah, Racine!
  • EirenistEirenist Shipmate
    The other day a British speaker on BBC World pronounced 'address' as 'ADDress'. In the UK, we say 'addRESS'. Presumable someome thought US viewers would think he meant 'a dress'.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    Both pronunciations are used here.
  • orfeoorfeo Shipmate
    And there is the common English language trend of placing the stress on the first syllable for a noun, and on the second syllable for a verb.

    To my mind the verb form would always be "addRESS", but the noun form would be more fluid.
  • I heard someone say for the letter H, "haych" this week. Took a bit to understand. Same person said glacier as glah-see-ur. Glay-see-ur is usual. Perhaps this was merely the pronunciation of one person. Not sure but she also seemed to say "observe" for "absurd".
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    edited October 21
    'An haitch' is quite widespread round here, but is widely also regarded as incorrect. I hear both 'glǎ-see- ǝ' and 'glay-see-ǝ' here, with a slight preponderance of the former and would regard either as correct. I don't think I've ever heard 'glah-see-ur' and would probably notice as it would sound very affected.

    I can't comment on 'absurd' as I don't know what's normal in Canada. I think the first syllable here is usually a ǝb with the emphasis on the 'surd'.

  • "Glay-shur" here. Yeah, yeah, go ahead and laugh...
  • That’s what I heard in Alaska as well. Heard it so often that now I have to remember not to say it myself (and it was nearly 30 years since I spent a few months there). Hereabouts it is Glah-see-ir.
  • "Glay-shur" here. Yeah, yeah, go ahead and laugh...
    I'm not sure I've ever heard anything other than GLAY-shur or GLAY-zhur, which Merriam-Webster gives as the two primary (and certainly American) pronunciations. M-W does also note the three-syllable pronunciation as British, but I think pronouncing it as "glay-see-ur" would be heard as affected here.

  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    I'm not sure I've ever heard anything other than GLAY-shur or GLAY-zhur, which Merriam-Webster gives as the two primary (and certainly American) pronunciations. M-W does also note the three-syllable pronunciation as British, but I think pronouncing it as "glay-see-ur" would be heard as affected here.

    How do you pronounce the occupation of a person who repairs your windows?
  • Interesting. I'm reminded of the three syllable version of diaper. We say die-per, the affected version is die-ă-per to my ears. Also cuneiform, which is kewn-ih-form, which I hear as "kewn-ay-ih-form" in some speech.

    @Lamb Chopped's glacier reminds me of the TV show "Frasier" and the word "nausea". Not sure how it gets from Fray-zur to Frājz-shur. And naw-zee-ah to nawz-shuh. (I didn't like the TV show, and I really hate being nauseated.)
  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    I'm not sure I've ever heard anything other than GLAY-shur or GLAY-zhur, which Merriam-Webster gives as the two primary (and certainly American) pronunciations. M-W does also note the three-syllable pronunciation as British, but I think pronouncing it as "glay-see-ur" would be heard as affected here.

    How do you pronounce the occupation of a person who repairs your windows?
    The window guy?

    Seriously, I don’t think I’ve ever heard a person in real life refer to a person who does windows as a glazier. I’ve only heard Glazier used as a surname, in which case it’s pronounced GLAY-zhur.

    And yes, in these parts, Frasier and Fraser are pronounced FRAY-zhur.

  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    I'm not sure I've ever heard anything other than GLAY-shur or GLAY-zhur, which Merriam-Webster gives as the two primary (and certainly American) pronunciations. M-W does also note the three-syllable pronunciation as British, but I think pronouncing it as "glay-see-ur" would be heard as affected here.

    How do you pronounce the occupation of a person who repairs your windows?
    The window guy?

    Seriously, I don’t think I’ve ever heard a person in real life refer to a person who does windows as a glazier. I’ve only heard Glazier used as a surname, in which case it’s pronounced GLAY-zhur.

    And yes, in these parts, Frasier and Fraser are pronounced FRAY-zhur.

    What if the window guy is a woman?

    Fray-zer for the latter.
  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    Nick Tamen wrote: »
    I'm not sure I've ever heard anything other than GLAY-shur or GLAY-zhur, which Merriam-Webster gives as the two primary (and certainly American) pronunciations. M-W does also note the three-syllable pronunciation as British, but I think pronouncing it as "glay-see-ur" would be heard as affected here.

    How do you pronounce the occupation of a person who repairs your windows?
    The window guy?

    Seriously, I don’t think I’ve ever heard a person in real life refer to a person who does windows as a glazier. I’ve only heard Glazier used as a surname, in which case it’s pronounced GLAY-zhur.

    And yes, in these parts, Frasier and Fraser are pronounced FRAY-zhur.

    What if the window guy is a woman?
    The window repair person, I suppose.

  • Nick Tamen wrote: »
    I'm not sure I've ever heard anything other than GLAY-shur or GLAY-zhur, which Merriam-Webster gives as the two primary (and certainly American) pronunciations. M-W does also note the three-syllable pronunciation as British, but I think pronouncing it as "glay-see-ur" would be heard as affected here.

    How do you pronounce the occupation of a person who repairs your windows?

    "The window guy is here, darling!" :mrgreen:
  • Gee D wrote: »
    Both pronunciations are used here.

    ADD-ress for the noun only; a-DRESS for either noun or verb.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    That is the more common usage, but you do hear ADD-ress as a verb, not often ADD-ressed, though I've heard it from time to time.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    I heard someone say for the letter H, "haych" this week. Took a bit to understand. Same person said glacier as glah-see-ur. Glay-see-ur is usual. Perhaps this was merely the pronunciation of one person. Not sure but she also seemed to say "observe" for "absurd".

    "Haych" or "haitch" used be a strong indicator of a parochial Catholic school education when I was growing up.
  • "Haitch" = putting an "H" sound at the beginning of naming the letter "H"?

    Like saying "'Hi' is spelled 'haitch eye'"?

    Thx.
  • ah-dress with slightly more uh-dress if clothing. Very similar.

    ROBINhood is very odd to my ears. The rob is drawn out as rawb. robinHOOD is normal here.

    Continue as cunTINyou here. CONtinyou by a UK transplant priest of my acquaintance.
  • Gee DGee D Shipmate
    More like kn-tin-you here.
  • EnochEnoch Shipmate
    'Glazier' is used as a word here, and pronounced 'glay-zi-ǝ'
  • EirenistEirenist Shipmate
    A slight tangent, but is the expression 'A good loser', as a term of mild approbation, known in the USA? Your present President, on current form, would be termed a 'bad loser' in the UK, and that is not a good thing to be here. Unsprtsmanlike!
  • Eirenist wrote: »
    A slight tangent, but is the expression 'A good loser', as a term of mild approbation, known in the USA? Your present President, on current form, would be termed a 'bad loser' in the UK, and that is not a good thing to be here. Unsprtsmanlike!
    I’m not familiar with it. We would say someone is “a sore loser,” “a good sport” or “a bad sport.”

  • A bad loser is what you would call a sore loser. I don't think I can think of another way to put a good loser. Maybe it is not an American concept.
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